Friday, July 11, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

DN: City needs to see some of that table game money; Nutter: Yes, yes we do.

As Anthony mentioned in Morning Money, Mayor Nutter and state lawmakers disagree over how to distribute local revenues from table games. Nutter wants the money to go straight into the city's general fund, and state lawmakers want the state Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) to administer it.

DN: City needs to see some of that table game money; Nutter: Yes, yes we do.

As Anthony mentioned in Morning Money, Mayor Nutter and state lawmakers disagree over how to distribute local revenues from table games. Nutter wants the money to go straight into the city's general fund, and state lawmakers want the state Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) to administer it.

The lawmakers are arguing that they want to make sure the revenues go directly to the impacted neighborhoods. And that makes sense! But there are valid concerns on the other side of the ledger, too. The Daily News weighs in today with an editorial arguing that the city should have at least some control over the money in question:

The city administers the services that can help mitigate the effects of casinos, like police and trash pickup. The DCED, while in the business of issuing grants, would be doing it on a case- by-case basis, with no overall strategy - and with no input from citizens. Plus, the influence that state lawmakers have over those grants is undeniable.

State lawmakers may have insight into the needs of their districts, but it's the job of local government to see that the city as a whole benefits.

Meanwhile, Chris Brennan got a killer quote from Mayor Nutter on this matter:

"I said I want the revenue to come to the city because what in the hell else am I going to say?" Nutter said. "The city has fiscal challenges."

Telling it like it is.

Review city services on our sister site, City Howl.

About this blog
Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

It's Our Money contributors

Tips? Comments? Questions?
Contact:

Holly Otterbein:
215-854-5809
hm.otterbein@gmail.com
@hollyotterbein

It's Our Money
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected