Monday, July 27, 2015

California budget deal; Ohio spending cuts; Gambling in Arizona

First, let's start with the big news: California has a budget. Finally. The biggest state in the country and sixth largest economy in the world has been the scene of a major budget stalemate. The 2/3 requirement to raise taxes has been a major obstacle to making a deal. Lawmakers have cut about $15 billion from the annual spending plan. Of course, California isn't the only state with budget problems. In Ohio, the state just adopted a spending plan that cut libraries, hunger programs, and education. Sound familiar? Speaking of familiar, lobbyists in Arizona are pushing to expand gambling to allow full-fledged casinos at race tracks. Gaming proponents say the proposal could help fill the $3 billion budget deficit. Right now, gambling is only allowed at casinos run by Native-American tribes.

California budget deal; Ohio spending cuts; Gambling in Arizona

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First, let's start with the big news: California has a budget. Finally. The biggest state in the country and sixth largest economy in the world has been the scene of a major budget stalemate. The 2/3 requirement to raise taxes has been a major obstacle to making a deal. Lawmakers have cut about $15 billion from the annual spending plan.

Of course, California isn't the only state with budget problems. In Ohio, the state just adopted a spending plan that cut libraries, hunger programs, and education. Sound familiar?

Speaking of familiar, lobbyists in Arizona are pushing to expand gambling to allow full-fledged casinos at race tracks. Gaming proponents say the proposal could help fill the $3 billion budget deficit. Right now, gambling is only allowed at casinos run by Native-American tribes.

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Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

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