Tuesday, July 7, 2015

IOM editorial: Electoral College proposal would be bad for Philly

Under a new plan from state Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi, Harrisburg Republicans will finally have their chance to make Philly go away - at least in an electoral sense.

IOM editorial: Electoral College proposal would be bad for Philly

0 comments
Dominic Pileggi
Dominic Pileggi
Travel Deals

Under a new plan from state Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi, Harrisburg Republicans will finally have their chance to make Philly go away - at least in an electoral sense. 

Pileggi's plan, which Gov. Corbett supports, would change the way Pennsylvania assigns its electoral votes in presidential elections. Right now, all 21 votes go to the candidate who gets the most votes statewide. Pileggi wants to give one vote to the winner of each congressional district, and two to the statewide winner.

Pileggi says he wants to build a system that better reflects the state's preferences. But Pileggi's system is not a purer form of democracy. The plan makes it possible that a candidate could win the state popular vote but lose the electoral vote. That's because Republican-controlled redistricting has concentrated many Democratic votes in a limited number of districts.

It gets worse. If Pennsylvania joined Maine and Nebraska, the only two states that apportion votes by district, other states that offer big electoral prizes would leapfrog us in importance. Candidates would have little reason to campaign here, because although Pennsylvania is now a swing state, most districts are either solidly blue or red - and candidates would ignore voters whose electoral votes are a foregone conclusion.

Chief among those newly ignored voters would be Philadelphians. The Electoral College system has problems, and the country should consider switching to a winner-take-all national popular vote. But it makes no sense for Pennsylvania to forfeit its influence just so a Republican candidate can pick up 10 more votes (which is rarely enough to swing a presidential election). Rather than making some Pennsylvania votes matter more, it would make all Pennsylvania votes - and Philadelphia votes - matter less.

Follow us on Twitter and review city services on our sister site, City Howl.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog
Every year, city government spends slightly more than $4 billion. Where does all that money come from? More importantly, where does it go? Are we getting the most bang for our tax buck? “It's Our Money” is a joint project between Philadelphia Daily News and WHYY, funded by the William Penn Foundation, designed to answer these questions.

It's Our Money contributors

Tips? Comments? Questions?
Contact:

Holly Otterbein:
215-854-5809
hm.otterbein@gmail.com
@hollyotterbein

It's Our Money
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter