Residents protest outside of Bryn Mawr Bank of America

A little more than a dozen local residents turned out for the 99% Spring Protest outside of the Bryn Mawr Bank of America.
A little more than a dozen local residents turned out for the 99% Spring Protest outside of the Bryn Mawr Bank of America. (Josh Fernandez / Philly.com)

More than a dozen residents in Bryn Mawr and the surrounding areas grabbed their picket signs and political bumper stickers for a protest outside of the town's Bank of America.

A little more than a dozen local residents turned out for the 99% Spring Protest outside of the Bryn Mawr Bank of America. Gallery: Residents protest outside of Bryn Mawr Bank of America

The protest, which occurred Wednesday afternoon, May 9, was part an effort to support The 99% Spring and MoveOn.org's protest of the bank, which had a shareholder meeting in Charlotte, N.C. According to MoveOn.org, the 99% Spring Bank Protest in Charlotte and at local branches sought to call attention to what both organizations saw as the bank's part in the economic downturn.

Bryn Mawr resident Theresa Donahue showed up to protest, hoping it would get enough recognition to encourage the bank's users to withdraw their money and go someplace else.

"This is about letting Bank of America know there are people out there who know undoubtedly what they are doing," Donahue said.

Karyn Hollis, the local organizer for the Bryn Mawr branch's protest, said she sent an e-mail to inform residents on MoveOn.org's listserv about the protest, and 35 responded that they would attend. As of 5:30 p.m. about 14 were present.

Hollis added that the protest was also in solidarity with the Occupy movement and supporting the 99 percent.

"This isn't a bank for America, it's a bank versus America," Hollis said. "It spends millions lobbying for the 1 percent in Congress, and it's laying off 30,000 employees."

A 25-year-old man from Berwyn who would only identify himself as "Gallendar," and whom protesters called "Anonymous," donned a Guy Fawkes mask he purchased back in October when he was a part of Occupy Philly. He wasn't concerned with the small number of protesters, focused instead on making sure afternoon commuters on Lancaster Avenue saw their posters and received the message to "stop corruption and support the 99 percent."

"Anywhere we can help spread the message is a good start...hopefully it'll make an impact," the Berwyn resident said.