Saturday, September 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Meat and potatoes

It may be stereotypical, but my son wants to learn recipes for red meat and potatoes

Meat and potatoes

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My daughter says she has not completely abandoned the blog, but she has certainly not been cooking, taking a few weeks before she starts medical school to visit friends, go to the beach, and do a lot of nothing.
So, I’ve implored my son to take a crack at this cooking thing. Sally had a preference for learning a lot of vegetarian dishes, or meals centered around fish or chicken.
While Tim’s favorite meals are more meat centric, everyone in the family loves crab cakes, so I thought that would be a recipe he was anxious to learn.
Well, not so much. Tim made it pretty clear. He wanted meat. Red meat. And potatoes. Colored vegetables were optional.
Okay then. He wanted to just grab a few steaks and throw them on the grill. But as he was home for dinner over the weekend, I suggested we cook together, and try London Broil, or top round. Much more meat, just as tasty, for a much better price. In fact the two pound slab of top round I bought was about $10. Even (what used to be less expensive) flank steak was about twice that price.
I did a quick marinade with fresh herbs and olive oil, coarse salt and pepper. Then while the grill was heating up, we cut up potatoes, zucchini and carrots.
We roasted the zucchini and carrots in the oven with a little olive oil and salt. Instead of whipped potatoes, which are not terribly hard but can be challenging for a new cook, we went with smashed potatoes.
They don’t need to be peeled, just cut up, boiled, then literally smashed with a potato masher, with butter, salt and a little milk. Even Tim was impressed at how easy they were.
The London Broil was grilled to a nice medium rare, so good that the son who never eats leftovers brought them home to his apartment for dinner the next night.
Two nights in a row without takeout is a good start.

London Broil, Smashed Potatoes, and Roasted Vegetables
Makes 4 servings
2 pounds of top round beef
3 tablespoons mixed chopped fresh herbs (rosemary, thyme, oregano, or marjoram
1½ teaspoons coarse salt, plus to taste for veggies
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper, plus to taste for veggies
4 medium-size Idaho potatoes, scrubbed but not peeled
2 zucchini, washed
4 carrots, washed and peeled
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided use
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons milk
1. Mix together and rub into the beef the herbs and salt and pepper. Drizzle with one tablespoon olive oil. Let the meat sit out for 1 hour at room temperature.
2. Prepare the grill.
3. Meanwhile, slice the zucchini and carrots into coins, and cut the potatoes into 2-inch chunks.
4. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Put the potatoes in a pot of cold water and bring to a boil.
5. When the grill is hot, put the meat on the grill and cook for 3 minutes on one side, turn over and cook for 3 minutes on the other side. Then turn down the heat, and cook for 6 or 7 minutes on each side for medium rare.
6. When the oven is hot, put the veggies on a sheet pan, drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and put in the oven for about 15 minutes.
7. Once the potatoes boil, set the timer for 10 minutes, but keep checking with a fork to see if they are soft.
8. When the potatoes are fork-tender, drain. Add butter and milk and smash the potatoes with a potato masher (with skins on) to desired consistency. (But don’t mash too much or they will turn to glue. They should be a little lumpy.)
9. Take steak off the grill and let rest for 5 minutes. Slice thinly across the grain and serve with potatoes and vegetables.

-Adapted  from a recipe from Alice Water's The Art of Simple Food 

 Per serving: 527 calories, 50 grams protein, 28 grams carbohydrates, 5 grams sugar, 22 grams fat, 138 milligrams cholesterol, 485 milligrams sodium, 5 grams dietary fiber

 

 

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About this blog

Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer food editor, has been cooking for 30 years. Her blog started with her daughter, but has been continuing for the past year with school children, this spring with fifth graders at Henry Lawton Elementary in Philadelphia. The program has expanded to 10 schools, with 20 volunteers working with a total of 50 urban children. The program is partnering with the Vetri Foundation for Children and Brown’s Shop Rite is providing the food.

Reach My Daughter's at mfitzgerald@phillynews.com.

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