Monday, February 8, 2016

SBA loans available to victims of fire in Cheltenham Twp.

SBA loans available to victims of fire in Cheltenham Twp.

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This story on the PRNewswire-USNewswire may be of interest to victims of the recent fire in Cheltenham Township, Montgomery County:

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Pennsylvania residents and businesses affected by the fire in Cheltenham Township on Oct. 5, 2012 can apply for low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration, SBA Administrator Karen G. Mills announced today.

Mills made the loans available in response to a letter from Gov. Tom Corbett on Oct. 15, requesting a disaster declaration by the SBA.  The declaration covers Montgomery County and the adjacent counties of Berks, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lehigh and Philadelphia.

"The SBA is strongly committed to providing the people of Pennsylvania with the most effective and customer-focused response possible to assist homeowners, renters, and businesses of all sizes with federal disaster loans," said Mills.  "Getting businesses and communities up and running after a disaster is our highest priority at SBA."

"Loans up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate.   Homeowners and renters are eligible for loans up to $40,000 to repair or replace damaged or destroyed personal property," said Frank Skaggs, director of SBA’s Field Operations Center East in Atlanta.

SBA’s customer service representatives are on hand at the Disaster Loan Outreach Center to answer questions about the disaster loan program, explain the process, issue and help individuals complete applications.

The center is located at Montgomery County Manor Apartments-Arcadia University 777 Limekiln Pike Glenside, Pennsylvania 19038. It will be open Oct. 23, and 24 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.;  Oct. 25, from noon to 9 p.m.; Oct. 26, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Oct. 27, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; closed Oct. 28; open Oct. 29, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closes for good at end of day Oct. 29.

Businesses and non-profit organizations of any size may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory, and other business assets," said David Dickson, SBA’s Philadelphia district director.

The SBA may increase a loan up to 20 percent of the total amount of disaster damage to real estate and/or leasehold improvements, as verified by SBA, to make improvements that lessen the risk of property damage by future disasters of the same kind.

For small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, small aquaculture businesses and most private non-profit organizations of all sizes, the SBA offers Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) to help meet working capital needs caused by the disaster.  EIDL assistance is available regardless of whether the business suffered any physical property damage.

Interest rates are as low as 1.688 percent for homeowners and renters, 3 percent for non-profit organizations and 4 percent for businesses with terms up to 30 years.  Loan amounts and terms are set by the SBA and are based on each applicant’s financial condition.

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website:
https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Individuals and businesses unable to visit the Center may also obtain information and loan applications by calling the SBA’s Customer Service Center at 1-800-659-2955 (1-800-877-8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing), or by sending an email to disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Loan applications can also be downloaded from the SBA’s website at www.sba.gov. Completed applications should be returned to the center or mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.

The filing deadline to return applications for physical property damage is December 17, 2012.  The deadline to return economic injury applications is July 18, 2013.
For more information about the SBA’s Disaster Loan Program, visit:
www.sba.gov.

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Montco Memo, a blog written by Inquirer staffer Jessica Parks, covers police and courts, issues and community news in Montgomery County.

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