Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Translating from college classroom to workplace

Being a dean in a liberal arts college, Susan Lawrence worries that graduates don't know how to translate what they've learned into something that is sellable in the job market. "They have to take their everyday experiences [as students] and show how they speak to employers' needs," she said.

Translating from college classroom to workplace

0 comments

Being a dean in a liberal arts college, Susan Lawrence worries that graduates don't know how to translate what they've learned into something that is saleable in the job market. "They have to take their everyday experiences [as students] and show how they speak to employers' needs," she said. 

I spoke this morning to Lawrence, who has the ponderous title of dean for educational initiatives and core curriculum for Rutgers University's School of Arts and Sciences in New Brunswick. Lawrence is convinced that a liberal arts degree has value, but the challenge is selling that value to employers who may roll their eyes when they see a liberal arts major such as philosophy on a resume.

Lawrence calls it "cross-walk." There's no point, she said, in graduates telling employers about the many research papers they wrote. Employers may not understand the amount of statistical analysis, number crunching and problem solving involved. Instead, graduates need to reframe their academic work in terms of real-life problems that an employer might encounter.

But that takes practice. This spring, Lawrence co-led a class designed to teach that kind of cross-walk, along with a way of thinking about jobs and careers. You can read more about it here.

Inquirer Staff Writer
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter
Topics: