Tuesday, July 28, 2015

The pajama frontier

This is really interesting. When you hear about people working from home, you usually figure it is a professional salaried person who can work anywhere with a laptop, but surprisingly, 45 percent of the organizations that responded to a recent survey, said they had hourly workers who put in their time at home. Despite the portable possibilities of work, telework is still the frontier when it comes to human resource management.

The pajama frontier

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This is really interesting. When you  hear about people working from home, you usually figure it is a professional salaried person who can work anywhere with a laptop, but surprisingly, 45 percent of the organizations that responded to a recent survey, said they had hourly workers who put in their time at home. Despite the portable possibilities of work, telework is still the frontier when it comes to human resource management. According to this survey, less than half of the companies had a formal selection process, a formal contract for flexible work or a system to evaluate technological effectiveness.

“The participation of non-exempt employees in flexible work programs is much higher than expected, but not as well-organized and orderly as is required by employment law,” said Charlie Grantham, managing director of Work Design Collaborative. “As flexible programs grow in both scale and scope, policy development in this area will become a critical human resource management issue.”

The survey was conducted by the Work Design Collaborative, a California-based research organization, for WorldAtWork, a global organization of human resource professionals who specialize in compensation practices.  Out of 2,000 companies surveyed, 135 responded. Of them, nearly half have more than 1,000 employees. A copy of the study, titled "Flexible Work Arrangements for Nonexempt Employees," is available by clicking here.    

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About this blog

Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
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