Monday, July 6, 2015

Push down to poverty

In Coatesville, the CareerLinks people are working hard to get jobs for the unemployed. Even jobs for the least educated are difficult to find and Cheryl Spaulding, who leads a suburban network of church-based support groups for the under and unemployed, has a theory about why this is happening.

Push down to poverty

0 comments

In Coatesville, the CareerLinks people are working hard to get jobs for the unemployed. Even jobs for the least educated are difficult to find and Cheryl Spaulding, who leads a suburban network of church-based support groups for the under and unemployed, has a theory about why this is happening.

"In the cities, you are talking about a younger population that's unemployed," said Spaulding, a founder of the original Joseph's People group that began in Downingtown. "In the suburbs, you are talking about older people who are unemployed."

I called Spaulding to get a reaction to the report on Pennsylvania's unemployed released Wednesday by the state's department of labor and industry. Because of her work, Spaulding is in regular contact with unemployed people as well as the folks at the Coatesville office of CareerLink, the state-based job search system. "The reason they can't get their people employed is because my people have the jobs," she said. "My highly-educated master’s degree people have the jobs that should be handled by young people who have high school degrees or who are graduating for community college."

She describe it as a push-down. "That's why you are seeing the poverty rate escalate," she said. "You have the middle class sinking down" and the weight of it is pushing the lower class into an even worse situation.

You can read more about the report in my story in the Philadelphia Inquirer. To see the full report, click the link to the department and click again on the right hand side of the page.

 

.

 

Inquirer Staff Writer
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter
Topics: