Monday, July 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Jolt By Juju

As usual, Philadelphia finds itself right in the middle when it comes to job availability, according to a recent study by Juju.com, an online aggregator of job postings. According to its calculations, there are four unemployed people for every job opening advertised online that Juju able to catch in its net. Best place is Washington D.C. and San Jose, California where there are fewer than two unemployed people for each open job. Baltimore is just a little over two people per job. Not surprisingly, Detroit ranks the worst with more than 14 unemployed people for each job.

Jolt By Juju

As usual, Philadelphia finds itself right in the middle when it comes to job availability, according to a recent study by Juju.com, an online aggregator of job postings. According to its calculations, there are four unemployed people for every job opening advertised online that Juju was able to catch in its net. Best place is Washington D.C. and San Jose, California where there are fewer than two unemployed people for each open job. Baltimore is just a little over two people per job. Not surprisingly, Detroit ranks the worst with more than 14 unemployed people for each job. 

Just to give you a city-wide view, New York has 2.5 unemployed people for each job opening, while the situation in Boston is 3.5 people. Pittsburgh has 3.87 people, edging Philly out slightly, while Philadelphia noses ahead of Seattle, San Francisco, Milwaukee and Richmond.

Juju did its calculations by dividing the number of unemployed in a metropolitan region (as supplied by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics) by the number of local online job postings. 

The BLS does a similar report monthly. Known as the Job Openings and Labor Turnover survey, the report said that at the end of February there were 2.7 million job openings and 14.8 million unemployed. That's 5.5 unemployed people for every job opening.

The ratio has been improving, but the 14.8 million unemployed number doesn't tell the whole story. It doesn't include people who are working part time jobs because they can't get full time work, nor does it include those who are so discouraged by the job search that they have given up looking. The government does not consider those people part of the labor force. To be counted as part of the labor force, you have to either have a job or be actively looking for one, if unemployed.  Obviously, if you factor in those folks, the 5.5 figure is inaccurate.  

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
About this blog

Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
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