Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Verizon advertising: Will sex sell healthcare cuts?

Whatever you think about Verizon and the unions in this management-labor battle, you have to hand it to Verizon's corporate advertising people for managing, somehow, to create a romantic/steamy advertisement that even hints at sex while pushing back against the union

Verizon advertising: Will sex sell healthcare cuts?

Whatever you think about Verizon and the unions in this management-labor battle, you have to hand it to Verizon's corporate advertising people for managing, somehow, to create a romantic/steamy advertisement that even hints at sex while pushing back against the union.

The print version shows a couple talking to each other, and man, are they in love -- so in "love" that the guy asks the woman what she likes about working as a technician at Verizon. Fascinating conversation. Judging on their looks for each other, the topic will soon change to something else, and we all know that guys will listen to almost anything enroute to that particular new topic, if you know what I mean.

In the radio advertisement, there's a couple, maybe it's the same couple, and it appears that they are married. They discuss the fact that Verizon wants to cut health benefits, but go on to say that the benefit will still be good. Then, and here's the amazing part -- they talk about starting a family (that's the sex part) and how they are still covered.  The guy's voice is smooth like buttermilk, mmm, and the woman in the advertisement obviously likes it too.

As a person who used to cover advertising, I bow my head in admiration. (You can read my advertising story in Wednesday's Inquirer by clicking here.)

The say sex sells. Well, we'll see -- what matters is the contract and the bargaining table.

Meanwhile, just want to let you know what local advertising executive Marc Brownstein, head of the Brownstein Group, says about the other Verizon advertisements -- the ones that say "You're Right," using the union's own words.

"It sort of takes you back," Brownstein said, adding that it provides an air of truthfulness. "It makes Verizon seem less like big brother and far more approachable and reasonable." In this time of transparency due to social media, that air of truthfulness is important, he said, because the social media makes the actual truth easier to unearth.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
About this blog

Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
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