Sunday, October 26, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Be prepared for your performance review

Preparation is key when it comes to a performance review, said Shawnice Meador, director of career management and leadership at the University of North Carolina's MBA program.

Be prepared for your performance review

Preparation is key when it comes to a performance review, said Shawnice Meador, director of career management and leadership at the University of North Carolina's MBA program.

Here are some of her suggestions:

Tips for a Successful Mid-Year Review:

·               Prepare a brief document that can act as an agenda during the meeting. Include status columns that incorporate the “Red, Yellow, Green” indicator system to help you and your manager easily evaluate the status of each project or goal and adjust if necessary.

 

·               Include additional projects you have been involved in and note how they contributed to the department’s objectives as well as your overall professional goals; give your manager the opportunity to weigh in and give his/her perspective to help guide you.

 

·               Think about things you’ve done from a career and professional development standpoint; make sure you have a mix of business goals and personal development goals to discuss for well-rounded job performance and career progress.

 

·               Come prepared with additional topics and questions to discuss with your manager; think about the bigger picture and  propose strategic areas you could personally impact that could contribute to the company’s overall yearly goals.

 

·               Be proactive - always track your goals.

 

·               Prepare a brief document that can act as an agenda during the meeting. Include status columns that incorporate the “Red, Yellow, Green” indicator system to help you and your manager easily evaluate the status of each project or goal and adjust if necessary.

 

·               Include additional projects you have been involved in and note how they contributed to the department’s objectives as well as your overall professional goals; give your manager the opportunity to weigh in and give his/her perspective to help guide you.

 

·               Think about things you’ve done from a career and professional development standpoint; make sure you have a mix of business goals and personal development goals to discuss for well-rounded job performance and career progress.

 

·               Come prepared with additional topics and questions to discuss with your manager; think about the bigger picture and  propose strategic areas you could personally impact that could contribute to the company’s overall yearly goals.

 

·               Be proactive - always track your goals and keep a working list to re-prioritize and help you stay on track for the year-end meeting.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
About this blog

Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
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