Wednesday, February 10, 2016

No wonder Eagles stink. So does Philadelphia's job scene

No wonder the Eagles never make it to the Super Bowl. Philadelphia's job record stinks, even worse than the team. No wonder the Eagles never make it to the Super Bowl. Philadelphia's job record stinks, even worse than the team.

No wonder Eagles stink. So does Philadelphia's job scene

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No wonder the Eagles never make it to the Super Bowl. Philadelphia's job record stinks, even worse than the team.

RiseSmart, an outplacement technology company in California, posits that the results of the Super Bowl game can readily be predicted by looking at the jobless rates of the two competing cities. The one with the lowest rate usually wins the Bowl. It's been that way 21 out of  26 contests. 

"Could it be a coincidence?  Of course – but it is certainly an interesting correlation," wrote Sanjay Sathe, CEO of RiseSmart.  "Who's to say that a city's economic prosperity, as measured by jobless rates, doesn't have at least some effect on fan support, team morale and other factors that could influence the game’s outcome?"

Let's look at the numbers: The Baltimore metropolitan area, home of the victorious Ravens, had an unemployment rate of 7 percent in December. San Francisco: 7.3 in December.

Philadelphia's rate was a staggering 8.4 percent in December -- this is for the entire metropolitan area.

Doesn't look like fired coach Andy Reid needed much outplacement help. The Kansas City Chiefs snatched him up. If Sathe's theory is correct, Reid should be super successful there. In December, the Kansas City metro area had an unemployment rate of 6.4 percent, lower than the Ravens.

"We all enjoyed Super Bowl Sunday, but now it's Monday – and there are far too many people who don't have jobs to go to," Sathe said.

(Note: In an earlier version, I said the company was in Texas: It's not. That's an address for some of its corporate business, so I corrected it.)

Inquirer Staff Writer
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About this blog

Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
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