Tuesday, July 28, 2015

A word on resumes

Words count when it comes to resumes, say Jim Bright and Joanne Earl, authors of Amazing Resumes, a book recently released by Jist Publishing. Your resume, if it is read at all, only has brief opportunity to make an impression. Try these words.

A word on resumes

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Words count when it comes to resumes, say Jim Bright and Joanne Earl, authors of Amazing Resumes, a book recently released by Jist Publishing.  Your resume, if it is read at all, only has brief opportunity to make an impression. Try these words.

These are some of the good verbs:

Achieved
Analyzed
Built
Compiled
Contributed
Controlled
Designed
Directed
Discovered
Eliminated
Established
Finalized
Founded
Initiated
Investigated
Managed
Modified
Organized
Overcame
Persuaded
Presented
Reorganized
Selected
Supervised
Trained
Transformed
Won
 

Here are some bad verbs -- even if the way you use them is positive (like avoided $1 million loss for my company), they evoke a visceral negative reaction, say the authors.

Abandoned
Argued
Attempted
Avoided
Conflicted
Disciplined
Dismissed
Failed
Lost
Relied
Relinquished
Succumbed
Tried
Withdrew
 

Here are some handy-dandy adverbs to dress up your verbs: (Unfortunately, the authors refer to them as power adjectives -- I will add the quote from them that made me retch: "You can also add power adjectives to boost the strength of your selling verbs even more.” This makes me question everything they say, but it does make common sense to use these kinds of words.)

Assertively
Capably
Carefully
Competently
Consistently
Cooperatively
Creatively
Decisively
Effectively
Efficiently
Energetically
Enthusiastically
Flexibly
Positively
Quickly
Rapidly
Responsibly
Resourcefully
Selectively
Successfully
Assertively
Capably
Carefully
Competently
Consistently
Cooperatively
Creatively
Decisively
Effectively
Efficiently
Energetically
Enthusiastically
Flexibly
Positively
Quickly
Rapidly
Responsibly
Resourcefully
Selectively
Successfully
  

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Jobbing covers the workplace – employment, unemployment, management, unions, legal issues, labor economics, benefits, work-life balance, workforce development, trends and profiles.

Jane M. Von Bergen writes about workplace issues for the Inquirer.

Married to a photographer she met at her college newspaper, Von Bergen has been a reporter since fourth grade, covering education, government, retailing, courts, marketing and business. “I love the specific detail that tells the story,” she says.

Reach Jane M. at jvonbergen@phillynews.com.

Jane M. Von Bergen Inquirer Staff Writer
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