Monday, July 6, 2015

Letters Extra: Journalism as it once was, and should continue

The "Almost Justice" series by Mike Newall was extraordinary.

Letters Extra: Journalism as it once was, and should continue

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Beau Zabel, pictured on a college trip to Ecuador, died on a city street in a still-unsolved murder. File
Beau Zabel, pictured on a college trip to Ecuador, died on a city street in a still-unsolved murder. File

Just a note of appreciation for a wonderful (and I hope award-winning) piece of journalism, the "Almost Justice" series by Mike Newall. The series was extraordinary and as depressing as the subject matter, I wish it had not concluded.

 In an age where superior investigative reporting has become an economic liability to news aggregations, your series could well represent a 'last hooray'. Journalism is being replaced by social media, and hard copy by tweets.

I can only imagine the untold hours of digging that 'Almost Justice' must reflect. Without Newall's writing talent, however, those long hours wouldn't matter.

Terry O'Brien,  Mount Laurel

Rhetorical footwork doesn’t help
<NO1>verified<NO>Charles Krauthammer would get many more readers to learn that he favors carbon dioxide emission reduction if he could avoid the pointless hyperbole<NO1> we must plow through first <NO> (“A pointless climate agenda,” July 8). The economy stagnates. Really? If Krauthammer calls doubling market indexes and a 3 percent reduction in unemployment stagnant, then how can we believe the rest of his argument? Obama a “flat earther.” That sounds more like a description of a Texas tea-partier. Entire states impoverished … “billions … for new Solyndras.” Solyndra was a better example of a freak event than the Alaskan heat wave. “Global temperatures flat for 16 years” is a deliberate misuse of statistics. How about the last 10 years or the last 5 years? By the time I reached Krauthammer’s conclusion on carbon dioxide reduction, I could no longer believe anything he said.
Robert Cohen, RichCharles Krauthammer would get many more readers to learn that he favors carbon dioxide emission reduction if he could avoid the pointless hyperbole<NO1> we must plow through first <NO> (“A pointless climate agenda,” July 8). The economy stagnates. Really? If Krauthammer calls doubling market indexes and a 3 percent reduction in unemployment stagnant, then how can we believe the rest of his argument? Obama a “flat earther.” That sounds more like a description of a Texas tea-partier. Entire states impoverished … “billions … for new Solyndras.” Solyndra was a better example of a freak event than the Alaskan heat wave. “Global temperatures flat for 16 years” is a deliberate misuse of statistics. How about the last 10 years or the last 5 years? By the time I reached Krauthammer’s conclusion on carbon dioxide reduction, I could no longer believe anything he said.Robert Cohen, Richboro 

 

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