Tuesday, July 29, 2014
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Coup in Honduras

So who exactly instigated the coup in Honduras?

Coup in Honduras

So who exactly instigated the coup in Honduras?

On one side, you have President Obama and the U.S. State Department, along with the Organization of American States, Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and the Castro brothers and others (an odd grouping illustrated by cartoonist Michael Ramirez), saying that the removal of Honduran leader Manuel Zelaya is illegal and he should be reinstated.

On the other side are those inside Honduras and out, who say the democratically elected Zelaya was trying to usurp his country's constitution with a referendum that was viewed as a means of extending his power. The Honduran Supreme Court ruled the referendum illegal.

Mary Anastasia O'Grady writes in the Wall Street Journal: "While Honduran law allows for a constitutional rewrite ... [a] constituent assembly can only be called through a national referendum approved by its Congress. But Mr. Zelaya declared the vote on his own and had Mr. Chavez ship him the necessary ballots from Venezuela. The Supreme Court rules his referendum unconstitutional, and it instructed the military not to carry out the logistics of the vote as it normally would do."

Zelaya defied the court order, leading to the confrontation with the military and his deportation to Costa Rica. He will be appealing to the international community to return to Honduras.

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