Saturday, August 29, 2015

Church officials couldn't shred the truth

With the deeply troubling disclosure that Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua ordered aides to shred a memo identifying 35 suspected predator priests, there’s no longer any question that Pennsylvania should give victims of long-ago abuse an avenue to have their day in court.

Church officials couldn't shred the truth

0 comments
William J. Lynn
William J. Lynn

With the deeply troubling disclosure that Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua ordered aides to shred a memo identifying 35 suspected predator priests, there’s no longer any question that Pennsylvania should give victims of long-ago abuse an avenue to have their day in court.

The revelations about Bevilacqua present a textbook illustration of what’s at stake in victims’ efforts to uncover the truth about the apparent cover-up of alleged abuse by clergy spanning decades. The cardinal died Jan. 31, on the eve of the sex-abuse trial of a former church administrator and two former parish priests.

Just as two Philadelphia grand juries concluded, Bevilacqua’s reported 1994 shredding directive, brought to light only last week, appears to confirm that there was a carefully orchestrated effort by Archdiocese of Philadelphia officials to shield predators.  Similarly, it has been revealed that Bevilacqua joined with other Pennsylvania bishops “to examine how the dioceses … can better protect their secret archives from civil-law discovery,” according to court records.

By hiding the truth from parishioners and police long after it was possible to prosecute alleged crimes, due to limitations statutes, the apparent church cover-up denied victims justice in the criminal courts.

Indeed, the conspiracy charges against Msgr. William J. Lynn, a top aide to Bevilacqua, and the counts being pursued against former priests James J. Brennan and Edward Avery for allegedly molesting a boy in the 1990s, are the exception. But victims would have another route to uncover the truth if they could file lawsuits under so-called civil-window legislation, which would relax the state’s statute of limitation for a specific period.

State Rep. Michael McGeehan (D., Phila.) has introduced a bill in Pennsylvania that mirrors the civil-window laws in California and Delaware. But Catholic officials continue to stymie Harrisburg’s efforts to act on the civil-window bill, with Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput among its most vocal and vehement opponents.

While church officials make the dubious claim that lawsuits could lead to parish closings and the like, sexual-abuse victims say their primary aim isn’t financial damages — but to uncover church records to expose the truth.  The Bevilacqua memo seems to be irrefutable proof that a cover-up not only occurred, but, in effect, will continue so long as the church’s battle against full disclosure continues.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

The Inquirer Editorial Board's Say What? opinion blog showcases the work of the editors and writers who produce the newspaper's daily and Sunday opinion pages.

Find out more about The Inquirer's Editorial Board here.

The Inquirer Editorial Board
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter