Sunday, September 21, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Archive: December, 2011

POSTED: Saturday, December 31, 2011, 5:00 AM

Will you be watching the Two Streeters on New Year's Day? What about updating the Mummer's Parade?

Cast your vote now.

Inquirer Editorial Board @ 5:00 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, December 31, 2011, 4:15 AM
Shelly D. Yanoff of Public Citizens for Children and Youth is one of many dedicated citizens who've helped improve life in the Philadelphia region. (ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / Staff Photographer)

Over the last eight years, Inquirer readers have easily identified dozens of neighbors who exemplify citizenship — each one fit to receive a Citizen of the Year award. This year is no exception.

2011’s choice will be announced Sunday, but the field comprised many worthy contenders who showed the importance of dedication, service, doggedness, and foresight. These nominees of readers and the Editorial Board are working to enhance growth, promote ethical government, fight poverty, preserve the environment, and expand opportunity.

For her years-long work on children’s causes, Shelly Yanoff, director of Public Citizens for Children and Youth, was applauded. A coalition-builder, she’s also willing to challenge the status quo to improve the health and welfare of Pennsylvania’s children. She does it with both fervor and humor — as when she presented lawmakers with cans of spinach and urged them to “be strong” for the kids.

Inquirer Editorial Board @ 4:15 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, December 30, 2011, 11:00 AM

Some American pharmaceutical companies are considering joining a global humanitarian effort to provide cheaper AIDS drugs in poor nations. Unfortunately, Johnson & Johnson is no longer among them.

The company announced last week that three drugs for treating HIV and AIDS — including one developed with the help of American taxpayers — would not be made available to a nonprofit hoping to improve access to them in developing countries. The decision has sparked fiery criticism of the company, and it shows a need for further efforts to resolve this conflict between public need and private profits.

Johnson & Johnson has an obligation to its shareholders to make money, and it certainly does that. But it must balance that with its social responsibilities.

Inquirer editorial board @ 11:00 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, December 30, 2011, 10:58 AM

Fellow Pennsylvanians, please raise a glass of your favorite state-issued alcoholic beverage, or illegal New Jersey import of same, for a New Year’s toast to the Liquor Control Board — namely, to its cockroach-like capacity to survive all disasters, most of them self-inflicted.

The LCB spent much of 2011 overseeing the slow-motion implosion of its latest attempt to mimic a legitimate business. Its “wine kiosks” — a small army of haywire adult vending machines deployed to the commonwealth’s supermarkets — showed once again what everyone knew: that the post-Prohibition agency is just not very good at the most significant part of its job, which is facilitating the consumption of wine and spirits.

For a finale, though, the beverage ministry showed that it’s also not very good at the other, diametrically different part of its job: hindering the consumption of wine and spirits. This disaster took the form of an advertising campaign apparently meant to promote responsible drinking, which ended up ham-handedly offering an excuse for sexual assault.

Inquirer editorial board @ 10:58 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Friday, December 30, 2011, 10:53 AM

Fellow Pennsylvanians, please raise a glass of your favorite state-issued alcoholic beverage, or illegal New Jersey import of same, for a New Year’s toast to the Liquor Control Board — namely, to its cockroach-like capacity to survive all disasters, most of them self-inflicted.

The LCB spent much of 2011 overseeing the slow-motion implosion of its latest attempt to mimic a legitimate business. Its “wine kiosks” — a small army of haywire adult vending machines deployed to the commonwealth’s supermarkets — showed once again what everyone knew: that the post-Prohibition agency is just not very good at the most significant part of its job, which is facilitating the consumption of wine and spirits.

For a finale, though, the beverage ministry showed that it’s also not very good at the other, diametrically different part of its job: hindering the consumption of wine and spirits. This disaster took the form of an advertising campaign apparently meant to promote responsible drinking, which ended up ham-handedly offering an excuse for sexual assault.

Inquirer editorial board @ 10:53 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Thursday, December 29, 2011, 9:22 AM
Traffic Court Judge Willie Singletary. (Clem Murray/Staff file photo)

The third unofficial strike against Willie F. Singletary, if proven, should be enough to rid Philadelphia Traffic Court of the man who may be Exhibit A for reform.

Singletary, 29, was unceremoniously escorted out of court last week over an allegation that he had displayed a photo of his genitals to a female court staffer. That is not what is meant in legal circles when someone asks to see your briefs.

There’s actually nothing funny about such behavior. It would amount to sexual harassment and, if founded, would be cause for Singletary’s overdue removal from the bench by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s judicial-discipline arm.

Author Name Here @ 9:22 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Thursday, December 29, 2011, 9:19 AM
City Commissioner Stephanie Singer and the US Department of Justice have opposed onerous voter ID laws. (Steven M. Falk / Staff Photographer)

The U.S. Department of Justice is taking a hard line with states that pass restrictive voting laws, which is good news for disadvantaged Americans who want their right to vote protected.

Using its powers under the 1965 Voting Rights Act, the Justice Department announced last week that it’s blocking a South Carolina law requiring voters to produce government-issued photo identification at the polls. The state is one of several that have imposed such restrictions on the flimsy grounds that they will discourage the extremely rare crime of impersonating a registered voter.

The restrictions are most likely to affect people without a driver’s license — generally the poor, young, and old. They will be forced to jump through time-consuming and potentially costly hoops to keep their right to vote, all to solve a problem that hardly seems to exist.

Inquirer editorial board @ 9:19 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Thursday, December 29, 2011, 5:00 AM

With Johnson & Johnson's decision not to participate in a program providing cheaper AIDS drugs in poor nations, a public debate has been restarted on the best way to achieve the same goal. Where do you stand?

Cast your vote now.

Inquirer Editorial Board @ 5:00 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog

The Inquirer Editorial Board's Say What? opinion blog showcases the work of the editors and writers who produce the newspaper's daily and Sunday opinion pages.

Find out more about The Inquirer's Editorial Board here.

The Inquirer Editorial Board
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected