Wednesday, August 27, 2014
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History Slows a Casino

If a Revolutionary War fort can't stop the SugarHouse casino, it surely can slow it.

History Slows a Casino

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225pxcolonelsimcoe If a Revolutionary War fort can't stop the SugarHouse casino, it surely can slow it.

Yesterday casino officials confirmed they're putting the breaks on excavation of the site after the Pa. Historical Preservation Office opined that no digging should begin until the area is thoroughly investigated for antiquities.

Thursday's column looked at efforts from a group of Philadelphia history hobbyists to bring to light details about a British fort built on the site in 1777. They began their work after contractors studying the site failed to mention the fort in their first phase report. They history hounds have had some real success.

In today's paper, Jeff Shields reports that the fort and remains of Indian activity pose enough of an obstacle that excavation planned for next week will stop. The Street Administration issued a grading permit last week, on its last day of business.

P1030175_2 The dude in the picture: That's John Simcoe,  commander of the Queen's Rangers, loyalists who manned British Redoubt No. 1. on the Delaware. Simcoe, a bellicose Oxford-educated chap, would go on to found some town called Toronto.

While he's portrayed wearing red, historian Robert Selig said last week that the Americans who sided with the British and stayed at the fort wore green coats. The better to forage in.

Finally, here's the map of the fort drawn back in the day by cartographer Lewis Nicola. Torben Jenk and Selig found it this week at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, which has allowed us to publish it here.

karp
Posted 01/11/2008 09:49:27 AM
reread your first line there.  you might want to change something.
daniel rubin
Posted 01/11/2008 12:35:26 PM
yeah, that'll teach me to file, then run out on an assignment.  fixed.
P. Newman
Posted 01/11/2008 01:22:15 PM
No one has asked me but in war between the casinos and their opponents, I hope the casinos win. I am an almost-lifelong resident of this city, and it has made me sad to see it slide further and further to insignificance since the exodus of the middle class to the suburbs began more than 30 years ago. It is beset with troubles, constantly struggling -- the poor cousin to the rich western suburbs. If the casinos will bring money into the city -- because let's face it, when the middle class left, they took their money with them -- then I say go for it. 
 
So the quality of life in the surrounding neighborhoods will be reduced? Like the quality of life is so great here anyway. We have plenty of bad things happening already, and no casino to blame it on. An 18th century map might go unseen in a museum? I'm not living to support museums. I have a greater respect for and interest in history than most people, but when you're talking about my financial well-being taking a back seat to historical significance, I object. 
 
I want to live in a viable, thriving city, not a backwater. I want the casinos and the money they will bring.

AT
Posted 01/11/2008 01:38:41 PM Uhmm! Nothing guarantees that money with stay in the city....it is state revenue. Do you think the rest of the state will share? No the "backwater" of PA will get it.
sueneely
Posted 01/11/2008 01:40:48 PM
Anything to slow that stupid casino is welcome!!
Bill Kearney
Posted 01/11/2008 04:07:22 PM
I could care less where they build these joints. What bothers me is that our Gaming Law has given our casino operators the right to operate with deceptive and fraudulent practices, which in return will breed compulsive casino gamblers, and that breeds criminals. In other words, Pennsylvania casinos are operating with no consumer protection. 

Now if you still don’t get my point I’ll make it easier for you by putting it in layman’s words. Let’s say its amusement parks instead of casinos opening throughout our state and in order for them to fill these parks so they could pay the same tax revenues as the casinos (55%) they’ve come up with a theme quite like no other? They’re going to abolish all safety provisions. That’s right, no seat belts, and no cages. And you will be aloud to wager money similar to the race tracks, in other words, it won’t be who came in; it will be who stayed in. And to minimize the fear factor they will serve free booze 24/7. Of course they will have Comps to justify you putting your life on the line. The ATMs will be available, along with check cashing, and to insure their patrons that they’re not in business to destroy individuals and families they will establish provisions and safeguards similar to those in our casinos. Things like signs throughout the amusement parks with a 1-800-Mor-onic get help number, and they’ll provide a 24-hour-a-day, 7-day-a-week hotline to counsel those who can’t control their suicidal desires. They will publicize treatment options, and training for employees staffing the amusement parks to recognize Daredevil like behavior. There will also be a self-exclusion list for those addictive riders, and there will be pamphlets and posters to educate about this phenomenon known as Kamikaze-Rider addiction. And being the state will be paid handsomely for hosting this form of entertainment, they will put aside millions of dollars for treatment and to compensate those who become crippled and families whose loved ones went overboard, (no pun intended) Now as ridicules as this comparison sounds it’s not that far off from how our casinos operate.

Today there are two Bills, one in our House of Representatives (HB 783) introduced by Rep. Clymer and one in our Senate (SB 423) introduced by Sen. Wonderling that will make the casinos send monthly statements. This would enable gamblers and their family members to spot a loved one's gambling problem before it gets out of hand. 

You can help by contacting your state legislator and tell them you support (HB 783) and (SB 423)

Open this link to view Gov. Rendell opinion on casinos mailing out monthly statements.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48BJzGvklSo


Michael
Posted 01/13/2008 07:33:54 AM
Why did'nt they look for them long before any talks of a casino were though of. Now that they found them I'm hoping they get them removed and fast so that they can continue with the casino. They should also look for them at the foxwoods site.and as far as the area is a great area with alot of rich people living near by.( the condos)
and parts of fishtown are looking richer with all the condo's and nice buildings.So I think it's a good thing for a casino to be built and bring some much needed jobs 
Casino for sale
Posted 01/14/2008 11:58:43 AM
I think that online casino is a good business, helping people to earn (and spend) money but I don't think that anybody could guarantee 100% safety of the software. Even Microsoft can't. The only thing they can prove is to show some certificates stating the quality of their cryptography. And if hackers will be from Russia - the soft will be destroyed.


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Posted 09/14/2009 01:26:56 PM
Buy xanax. Xanax.
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About this blog
Daniel Rubin is a columnist and The Inquirer's director of social media. Since joining newspaper as a staff writer in 1988, Daniel Rubin has reported from Mayfair to Macedonia, 27 countries in all. He has been the European Correspondent for Knight Ridder Newspapers and for two years he sat at home and wrote Blinq, the paper's first daily blog. Dan began newspaper work in Norfolk and Louisville, Ky., after getting his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Northwestern University. He has lived in all four commonwealths, most recently in Pennsylvania. He teaches urban journalism at the University of Pennsylvania

Email Blinq here. My day job - Inquirer metro columnist - is here.

Reach Daniel at drubin@phillynews.com.

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