Wednesday, August 27, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

What People Are Reading On Blogs

A Forrester research report shows that while your parents have probably heard the word Podcast, they are definitely not downloading those audio files and running around with them. Neither are your neighbors. Or you. Or me. Only one percent of us download and listen to these Podcasts regularly, slightly more than the percentage who still use curb feelers. DayPop lists a Forrester's post on this as the seventh most-read piece of bloggery as of Sunday.

What People Are Reading On Blogs

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Talking_lips A Forrester research report shows that while your parents have probably heard the word Podcast, they are definitely not downloading those audio files and running around with them. Neither are your neighbors. Or you. Or me. Only one percent of us download and listen to these Podcasts regularly, slightly more than the percentage who still use curb feelers. DayPop lists a Forrester's post on this as the seventh most-read piece of bloggery as of Sunday.

The summary: "Podcasts have hit the mainstream consciousness but have not yet seen widespread use. One-quarter of on line consumers express interest in podcasts, with most interested in time-shifting existing radio and Internet radio channels.  Companies that are interested in using Podcasts for their audio should focus not only on downloads but also on streaming  audio as a means to get their content and ads to consumers."

Here's a personal story - I get the technology. I listened to home-grown movie critics and dirty-talking Dawn and Drew while researching an article in late 2004. My iTunes lets me subscribe to different Podcasts, and I have from time to time grabbed radio programs from WXPN and KCRW to-go. But I'd rather listen to other things. I would love to hear from anyone who is an active Podcaster. What's worth the time?

The third-most-popular blog post, according to DayPop, is an old-fashioned rant about a lousy phrase that's almost ruining a good thing. Who thought of calling all the cool things people create and put up online "user-generated content?"

First? A piece explaining how MAC users will be able to fire up Windows operating systems with the flick of a switch. The post, from Apple, is called Boot Camp. They write that this venture capitalizes on the Mac's increasing popularity. The Wall Street sampled blogopinion, which ranged from "awesome" to "appalled." Boing Boing quoted one of its readers, a Starbucks barista, who wrote:

"We have this shorthand term we use when a customer wants a nonfat decaf latte -- we call the drink a 'why bother.' This is kinda like one of those."

Finally, number 11, mentioned really so we can have some alluring artwork: The 20 strangest gadgets. Like these flaming lips. They talk.

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About this blog
Daniel Rubin is a columnist and The Inquirer's director of social media. Since joining newspaper as a staff writer in 1988, Daniel Rubin has reported from Mayfair to Macedonia, 27 countries in all. He has been the European Correspondent for Knight Ridder Newspapers and for two years he sat at home and wrote Blinq, the paper's first daily blog. Dan began newspaper work in Norfolk and Louisville, Ky., after getting his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Northwestern University. He has lived in all four commonwealths, most recently in Pennsylvania. He teaches urban journalism at the University of Pennsylvania

Email Blinq here. My day job - Inquirer metro columnist - is here.

Reach Daniel at drubin@phillynews.com.

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