Monday, August 31, 2015

Is obesity child abuse?

It's no surprise that the case of the 200-pound Cleveland Heights third grader who was placed in foster care after the county claimed his mother wasn't doing enough to keep him healthy has generated debate across the nation.

Is obesity child abuse?

0 comments
Blog Image
Anamarie at 3

It's no surprise that the case of the 200-pound Cleveland Heights third grader who was placed in foster care after the county claimed his mother wasn't doing enough to keep him healthy has generated debate across the nation.

I don't know about you, but it seems to me that, when it comes to the welfare of our children, we've got a lot more pressing issues to concern ourselves with (hello, Jerry Sandusky) than whether a mom gives her kid too many Happy Meals.

Not that I'm making light of childhood obesity. Far from it. When roughly 2 million of our children are obese, nobody can argue we're dealing with a national epidemic. It's why First Lady Michelle Obama's "Let's Move!" initiative is so needed.

What's hard to argue is when, exactly, does a child require intervention? Does a child weighing 200 pounds means he's living in an abusive household but 190 doesn't? I wouldn't want to tread down that slippery slope. 

Still, as recently as last summer, an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association cited that "parenting deficiencies" may be justifiable for removing an obese child from the home.

And then there's the case of New Mexico toddler Anamarie Martinez-Regino, who was placed in foster care after ballooning to 124 pounds. But her stay was short-lived after doctors discovered she suffered from a rare disease that caused her weight to yo-yo.

Slippery slope indeed. 

To read an update about Anamarie, who is now 7 and pictured on the left, click here.

 

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog
Blinq is a news commentary blog featuring contributions from Inquirer Metro columnists Kevin Riordan and Daniel Rubin.

Kevin Riordan Inquirer Columnist
Daniel Rubin Inquirer Columnist
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter