Friday, July 3, 2015

Supreme Court denies BRT's bid to stop May election

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court today refused to strike from the May 18 primary ballot a charter change that - if approved by voters - would abolish the Board of Revision of Taxes.

Supreme Court denies BRT's bid to stop May election

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The Pennsylvania Supreme Court today refused to strike from the May 18 primary ballot a charter change that - if approved by voters - would abolish the Board of Revision of Taxes.

The ruling, which the court issued without comment, means it is almost certain that voters will have the chance to weigh in on the BRT's fate next month.

The BRT's suit contended that the city lacked the authority to completely dismantle the seven-member board. It argues that the state legislature specifically vested assessment appeals powers with the BRT, and required that BRT leaders be appointed by the city's judiciary.

The proposed charter change would dismantle the BRT and split it into two new agencies: an office of property assessment under the indirect control of the mayor, which would set property values, and an independent board to hear property assessment appeals.

More coverage
 
It's Our Money: Tax amnesty: Big Brother, or Oh, brother?
 
Nutter in Chicago Today

More to come soon...

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The Philadelphia Inquirer's Chris Hepp, Tricia Nadolny, Julia Terruso, and Claudia Vargas take you inside Philadelphia's City Hall.

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