Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Police unions bash pension bill

The state Fraternal Order of Police came out this morning against the House bill that ties desperately-needed Philadelphia budget issues to sweeping changes in the state's pension system.

Police unions bash pension bill

0 comments

The state Fraternal Order of Police came out this morning against the House bill that ties desperately-needed Philadelphia budget issues to sweeping changes in the state's pension system.

FOP Pennsylvania State Lodge President Les Neri said House Bill 1828, which calls for a state-takeover of severely distressed pension funds and removes significant pension benefits from collective bargaining, threatens thousands of police officers and firefighters' retirements and "ends 40 years of collective bargaining."

Neri chided the Senate for ramming major changes in the matter of a few weeks, tied to Philadelphia's request for a 1-cent per dollar increase in its sales tax, and changes to its own pension system.

Both the FOP and state Professional Firefighters Association have come out against the bill, which is drawing heat from organized labor across the board. 

Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

The Philadelphia Inquirer's Chris Hepp, Tricia Nadolny, Julia Terruso, and Claudia Vargas take you inside Philadelphia's City Hall.

Inquirer City Hall Staff
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter