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Philly's African-Caribbean Affairs ex-chair in D.C. scandal

Stanley L. Straughter, an international trade consultant based in Philadelphia, has given up his position as chairman of a city commission on African and Caribbean Immigrant Affairs, after agreeing to a guilty plea of making illegal corporate campaign contributions, in a Washington D. C. political scandal.

Philly's African-Caribbean Affairs ex-chair in D.C. scandal

Stanley L. Straughter, an international trade consultant based in Philadelphia, has given up his position as chairman of a city commission on African and Caribbean Immigrant Affairs, after agreeing to a guilty plea of making illegal corporate campaign contributions, in a Washington D. C. political scandal.

The city commission was created in 2005 by former Mayor John Street, at the urging of City Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell. Straughter, elected to head the panel by his fellow commissioners, submitted a letter of resignation to Blackwell Sunday, according to Mark McDonald, a spokesman for the Nutter administration.

Nutter has had no involvement with the immigrant panel, McDonald said.

Straughter pleaded guilty Monday in U. S. District Court in Washington, D. C., to a misdemeanor count of making illegal corporate contributions, acknowledging that he had distributed $132,600 in political donations in his own name, his relatives’ names and his company’s name, but was reimbursed illegally by a D. C. accounting firm, Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio and Associates, a contractor with the D. C. government.

Court documents cited by the Washington Post said Straughter, 71, was a contractor for the firm, providing “marketing and consulting services.”

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Stanley L. Straughter, an international trade consultant based in Philadelphia, has given up his position as chairman of a city commission on African and Caribbean Immigrant Affairs, after agreeing to a guilty plea of making illegal corporate campaign contributions, in a Washington D. C. political scandal.

The city commission was created in 2005 by former Mayor John Street, at the urging of City Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell. Straughter, elected to head the panel by his fellow commissioners, submitted a letter of resignation to Blackwell Sunday, accor

Stanley L. Straughter, an international trade consultant based in Philadelphia, has given up his position as chairman of a city commission on African and Caribbean Immigrant Affairs, after agreeing to a guilty plea of making illegal corporate campaign contributions, in a Washington D. C. political scandal.

The city commission was created in 2005 by former Mayor John Street, at the urging of City Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell. Straughter, elected to head the panel by his fellow commissioners, submitted a letter of resignation to Blackwell Sunday, according to Mark McDonald, a spokesman for the Nutter administration.

Nutter has had no involvement with the immigrant panel, McDonald said.

Straughter pleaded guilty Monday in U. S. District Court in Washington, D. C., to a misdemeanor count of making illegal corporate contributions, acknowledging that he had distributed $132,600 in political donations in his own name, his relatives’ names and his company’s name, but was reimbursed illegally by a D. C. accounting firm, Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio and Associates, a contractor with the D. C. government.

Court documents cited by the Washington Post said Straughter, 71, was a contractor for the firm, providing “marketing and consulting services.”

 

ding to Mark McDonald, a spokesman for the Nutter administration.

Nutter has had no involvement with the immigrant panel, McDonald said.

Straughter pleaded guilty Monday in U. S. District Court in Washington, D. C., to a misdemeanor count of making illegal corporate contributions, acknowledging that he had distributed $132,600  in political donations in his own name, his relatives’ names and his company’s name, but was reimbursed illegally by a D. C. accounting firm, Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio and Associates, a contractor with the D. C. government.

Court documents cited by the Washington Post said Straughter, 71, was a contractor for the firm, providing “marketing and consulting services.” 

Bob Warner Inquirer Staff Writer
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