Friday, August 28, 2015

Nutter airs ads against flash mobs

Mayor Nutter will be featured on television and radio ads urging parents to stay on top of their children's whereabouts as a way to combat the further spread of the flash-mob phenomenon that has turned Center City on its head in recent weeks. The ads are reminiscent of campaigns that began more than 40 years ago and asked parents: "Do you know where your children are?"

Nutter airs ads against flash mobs

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Mayor Nutter will be featured on television and radio ads urging parents to stay on top of their children's whereabouts as a way to combat the further spread of the flash-mob phenomenon that has turned Center City on its head in recent weeks. The ads are reminiscent of campaigns that began more than 40 years ago and asked parents: "Do you know where your children are?"

Read the press release below:

The City of Philadelphia announced today a series of television and radio public service announcements (PSAs) that are currently airing in response to recent incidents involving large gatherings of young people. CBS3, Fox 29, NBC 10, 6abc, Clear Channel Radio and Radio-One are currently airing a message from the mayor asking parents if they know where their children are while encouraging them to stay involved in their children’s lives and monitor their behavior and whereabouts. PSAs are airing at various times of the day and can be viewed on Channel 64 and on www.phila.gov/mayor.

“A small group of kids who have caused trouble should not reflect poorly on the majority of our youth who are well-behaved and want to enjoy themselves in a peaceful way,” said Mayor Nutter. “There are plenty of activities to keep our kids busy in after-school programs but it’s the responsibility of parents to know where their children are late at night.” Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey, District Attorney Seth Williams, Philadelphia School District officials, business organizations, community groups and media organizations are working with the Mayor to apply a cross-collaborative approach of enforcing additional public safety measures while engaging with parents to be more active in their children’s lives.

At Headhouse Square on March 24th, Mayor Nutter, Commissioner Ramsey and D.A. Williams announced additional policing, stricter enforcement of youth curfews, monitoring of social networking channels, coordination with the FBI, and a potentially tougher response from the judicial system for those caught engaging in disruptive behavior as well as their parents and guardians. As part of the March 27th ‘Philly Family  Fun’ tour on South Street, Mayor Nutter and his family were joined by City officials and community members to talk with visitors and business owners and to declare Philadelphia a safe, livable and walkable city while encouraging people to enjoy Philadelphia’s attractions and neighborhoods. The Mayor’s Office has remained engaged with the business community and civic organizations to update them on the City’s response.

“Do you know where your children are?” was the theme of a popular public service announcement that aired throughout the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s. Depending on the market and local youth curfew times, these PSAs would typically air at 10:00 p.m. or 11:00 p.m.

Text of Mayor Nutter’s Public Service Announcement
(Note: There may be slight variations on different media channels)

This is Mayor Michael Nutter.  We all want the best for our children.  I know I do.  And the best thing we can do as parents is to be involved in their lives.  It shows them that they are cared for.  

It’s never easy, but children who have parents who ask questions, know their friends and show interest in their lives are less likely to get in trouble.

I strongly encourage all parents to know where your children are going and what they are doing.

We may feel like we’re being overbearing, but our kids will know we care. It’s late. Do you know where your children are?  Be a responsible parent.  Please check on your kids

 

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The Philadelphia Inquirer's Chris Hepp, Tricia Nadolny, Julia Terruso, and Claudia Vargas take you inside Philadelphia's City Hall.

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