Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Ballot positions are in

City Councilman William K. Greenlee, considered potentially at-risk in this year's Democratic primary, went a long way toward keeping his job through sheer luck Wednesday -- he drew the No. 1 ballot position.

Ballot positions are in

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City Councilman William K. Greenlee, considered potentially at-risk in this year's Democratic primary, went a long way toward keeping his job through sheer luck Wednesday -- he drew the No. 1 ballot position.

In a cast of 21 Democratic candidates running for Council, being number one on the ballot means a lot on election day.

"The biggest thing is, the folks who want to find me, will find me," Greenlee said outside Courtroom 676 in City Hall, where three judges acting as the Board of Elections presided over the drawings Wedneday morning. "There's no getting lost on the ballot."

Greenlee, known to all as "Bill", only goes by William K. on the ballot, in part, to avoid confusion with Bill Green. He received a stream of congratulatory hugs from political insiders after his lucky draw.

The courtroom was packed as the ritual drawing beganm, with many candidates there in person.

In the Republican at-large race, with 10 candidates, former District Attorney candidate Michael Untermeyer scored the top position. Councilman Frank Rizzo drew no 7.

Among other Democrats, incumbents Blondell Reynolds Brown drew 5, W Wilson Goode drew 20, James F. Kenney drew 14, and Bill Green drew 11, with challengers Sherrie Cohen drawing 6 and Andy Toy drawing 15.

Drawing the No. 1 position among 15 candidates for traffic court was Christine Solomon.

 Mayor Nutter's name will appear below Milton Street's, which drew laughter even from the judges running the meeting.

Republican city commissioner Joseph Duda will appear first, above 3 rivals. Among Democratic City Commission candidate - there are 7: Warren Bloom is first, Michael Bell is 2nd, Stephanie Singer is 5th, Tartaglione is 7th

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The Philadelphia Inquirer's Chris Hepp, Tricia Nadolny, Julia Terruso, and Claudia Vargas take you inside Philadelphia's City Hall.

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