Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Anna Nguyen

POSTED: Friday, March 7, 2014, 9:34 AM
Filed Under: Anna Nguyen | Product Recalls

Design Ideas recalled about 26,900 Rubber Ducky Magnets, and Design Ideas Blowfish and Splat Magnets
due to an ingestion hazard. The recall involves miniature office and refrigerator magnets sold in the shape of a duck, blowfish and a splat. A small magnet is affixed to the underside of the brightly colored plastic objects which were sold in sets of four or six

If the magnets are detached from product and swallowed, they can link together inside a child's intestines and clamp onto body tissues, causing intestinal obstructions, perforations, sepsis and death. Internal injury from magnets can pose serious lifelong health effects.

For more information, go to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission website.

POSTED: Thursday, March 6, 2014, 5:30 AM
A man drinking alcohol as part of the game NekNominate. (via youtube/oakelfish)

If you look up “NekNominate” on YouTube, here’s a preview of what you’ll find: A 20-something pouring beer down a toilet who is then whisked up by friends to drink it upside down. In another video, a young man mixes up a disturbing cocktail of alcohol, milk, live bugs, and a dead mouse in a food processor before drinking it.

What is happening? Kids are being nominated by their peers to take video of themselves downing — or "necking" — strong drinks under bizarre or dangerous circumstances before challenging others to film an even more shocking video to post online within 24 hours. Refusing a nomination could lead to being teased over social media.

The game is believed to have started in Australia and has spread rapidly across the world due to Twitter and Facebook. While some of the videos can be viewed as harmless fun, the drinking game has been linked to at least five deaths of men under the age of 30, CNN reported.



POSTED: Monday, February 24, 2014, 9:32 AM
Filed Under: Anna Nguyen | Product Recalls

Infantino recalled about 191,000 Go Gaga Squeeze & Teethe Coco the Monkey teething toys because the monkey's tail can pose a choking hazard to young children.

Sold exclusively at Target, this squeaking toy is made of soft orange rubber and is shaped like a monkey. The toy measures 4.5 inches tall by 5 inches long and is intended for ages newborn and up.

The comany received seven reports of infants choking or gagging on the monkey’s tail. No injuries have been reported. For more information, go to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission website.


POSTED: Monday, February 24, 2014, 9:32 AM
Filed Under: Anna Nguyen | Product Recalls

U.S. Polo Assn. recalled about 1,400 girl’s jacket because they have a band of material at the neck that can pose a strangulation hazard to young children.

The jackets, sold at Burlington Coat Factory, Kids Stop and Cookie’s Department Stores, have the name U.S. Polo Assn. with the year 1890 and crossed polo mallets on the jacket’s upper right exterior and a silhouette of two polo players and the initials USPA on the jacket’s upper left exterior.  The jackets come in the colors fuchsia, green and cream in girl’s sizes 4-16. 

No injuries have been reported. For more information, go to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission website.


POSTED: Monday, February 17, 2014, 6:00 AM
Filed Under: Anna Nguyen | Recipes

Many of us are usually trying find recipes that cut calories, but famlies with sickle cell diseases need more calories to stay healthy.

Now these famlies have a new resource that can help -  the sickle cell team at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children led by dietitian Michell Fullmer recently developed a unique cookbook that offers appealing and healthy calorie-dense meals and snacks such as loaded oatmeal, smoothies, frittatas, and chili. The free cookbook is available online here.

Kids and teens with sickle cell disease break down red blood cells faster than other children do, their bodies use more energy and need more calories to maintain health, avoid complications, and keep pace with their peers. High calorie foods and extra snacks can be very helpful.

Sickle cell disease are are a group of inherited red blood cell disorders. Healthy red blood cells are round, and they move through small blood vessels to carry oxygen to all parts of the body. In someone who has SCD, the red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like a C-shaped farm tool called a “sickle”. The sickle cells die early, which causes a constant shortage of red blood cells, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
POSTED: Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 8:07 PM
Filed Under: Anna Nguyen | Product Recalls
BebeLove recalled about 3,600 of its walkers because they failed to meet federal safety standards.

BebeLove recalled about 3,600 of its walkers because they failed to meet federal safety standards. They were sold for babies age 6 months or older. The walkers contain a plastic- covered foam padded seat with a plastic base and toy tray.

Style number 358 can fit through a standard doorway and is not designed to stop at the edge of a step as required by the federal safety standard. In addition, style number 368 contains leg openings that allow the child to slip down until the child’s head can become entrapped at the neck. Babies using these walkers can be seriously injured or killed, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

No injuries have been reported. For more information, go to the CPSC website.


POSTED: Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 9:50 AM

Childhood obesity and access to health care remain some of the most pressing issues when it comes to children’s health in Bucks, Delaware and Chester counties, according to recently released reports from Public Citizens for Children and Youth, a children’s advocacy non-profit.

The reports found that nearly 20,000 children in Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery counties are uninsured.  More than a quarter of those kids (5,692) are undocumented and cannot enroll in CHIP or Medical Assistance. 

In the three counties, about 114,000 children are overweight or obese. In addition, disparities persisted between children of different races, ethnicities, insurance statuses and incomes.

POSTED: Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 9:24 AM
Filed Under: Anna Nguyen | Product Recalls

Runway Global recalled about 820 girls’ Sugarfly hooded jackets because they have a drawstrings in the hood around the neck area which can pose a strangulation hazard to children. This recall involves three styles of Sugarfly-branded hooded, woven cotton and woven polyester jackets for girls with a drawstring through the hood. They were sold exclusively at Burlington Coat Factory.

No injuries have been reported. For more information, go to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission website.


Have a question for the Healthy Kids panel? Ask it here.

About this blog
The Healthy Kids blog is your window into the latest news, research and advice around children's health. Learn more about our growing list of contributors here.

If you have questions about your child's health, ask them here.

Anna Nguyen Healthy Kids blog Editor
Stephen Aronoff, M.D., M.B.A. Temple University Hospital
Christopher C. Chang, M.D., Ph.D Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical Colg
Mario Cruz, M.D St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, Drexel University College of Medicine
Katherine K. Dahlsgaard, Ph.D. Lead Psychologist - The Anxiety Behaviors Clinic, CHOP
Gary A. Emmett, M.D. Director of Hospital Pediatrics at TJU Hospital & Pediatrics Professor at Thomas Jefferson Univ.
Lauren Falini Bariatric exercise physiologist, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children
Hazel Guinto-Ocampo, M.D. Nemours duPont Pediatrics/Bryn Mawr Hospital
Rima Himelstein, M.D. Crozer-Keystone Health System
Anita Kulick President & CEO, Educating Communities for Parenting
Janet Rosenzweig, MS, PhD, MPA VP for Programs & Research for Prevent Child Abuse America
Beth Wallace Smith, RD Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
W. Douglas Tynan, Ph.D. Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Jefferson Medical Colg
Flaura Koplin Winston, MD, PhD Scientific Director of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Center for Injury Research and Prevention
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