Thursday, September 3, 2015

Tai chi eases patients' pain

Tai chi, a combination of meditation, relaxation and slow, graceful movements, originated in China as a martial art. Now, a study led by Tufts University shows that the mind-body practice can be therapeutic for fibromyalgia. Researchers randomly assigned 66 patients to twelve weeks of classes that taught either tai chi, or stretching exercises and wellness education. The tai chi group had greater improvements in their scores on questionnaires that measured qualify of life and the severity of fibromyalgia symptoms.

Tai chi eases patients' pain

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In Monday’s Health & Science Section my colleague Marie McCullough has a short item on the how people who with fibromyalgia - a complex pain syndrome - benefited from the tai chi, an ancient, slow-movement martial art from China. Here's a preview of that item for Check Up readers:

If you suffer from the common, complex muscle-bone pain syndrome known as fibromyalgia, try tai chi.

Tai chi, a combination of meditation, relaxation and slow, graceful movements, originated in China as a martial art. Now, a study led by Tufts University shows that the mind-body practice can be therapeutic for fibromyalgia.

Researchers randomly assigned 66 patients to twelve weeks of classes that taught either tai chi, or stretching exercises and wellness education. The tai chi group had greater improvements in their scores on questionnaires that measured qualify of life and the severity of fibromyalgia symptoms.

The study, in the current edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, also found that tai chi was safe — no “adverse events.”

To check out more Check Up items go to www.philly.com/checkup.

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About this blog

Check Up is a blog for savvy health consumers, covering the latest developments, discoveries, and debates from the Philadelphia area and beyond.

Portions of this blog may also be found in the Inquirer's Sunday Health Section.

Charlotte Sutton Health and Science Editor, Philadelphia Inquirer
Tom Avril Inquirer Staff Writer, heart health and general science
Stacey Burling Inquirer Staff Writer, neuroscience and aging
Marie McCullough Inquirer Staff Writer, cancer and women's health
Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph. President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Daniel R. Hoffman, Ph.D. President, Pharmaceutical Business Research Associates
Hooman Noorchashm, M.D., Ph.D. Cardiothoracic surgeon in the Philadelphia area
Amy J. Reed, M.D., Ph.D. Anesthesiologist and Surgical Intensivist in the Philadelphia Area
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