Monday, August 3, 2015

Sweet water could help pain of shots for infants

A new study in the BMJ journal Archives of Disease in Childhood may have an answer for us. A drink of sweetened water apparently eases the pain of shots and reduces crying in infants up to the age of 12 months. Researchers from Canada, Australia and Brazil examined the results of 14 randomized control trials involving 1,674 injections of infants to determine if sweetened water helped babies endure shots. Vaccine, vaccinate, vaccination, immunize, immunization, inject, flu shots

Sweet water could help pain of shots for infants

0 comments

With both our daughters, my wife and I have fought to see who had to hold the children when they are getting shots. It’s good natured, but both of us really want to avoid the pain it inflicts on us to be the parent when our children have even the fleeting pain of needle pricks for vaccinations.

A new study in the BMJ journal Archives of Disease in Childhood may have an answer for us. A drink of sweetened water apparently eases the pain of shots and reduces crying in infants up to the age of 12 months. Researchers from Canada, Australia and Brazil examined the results of 14 randomized control trials involving 1,674 injections of infants to determine if sweetened water helped babies endure shots.

It was known that oral sucrose, glucose or other sweet solutions acted as painkillers for newborns during procedures, such as shots, that cause small amounts of pain. The researchers examined existing studies to see if the analgesic effect held for older children.

They concluded that “healthcare professionals should consider sucrose or glucose before and during immunization.”

My youngest daughter is almost 9-months-old and due for another round of immunizations in late May. Maybe giving her a little sweet water in advance is worth a shot.

0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

Check Up covers regional health news and a wide array of healthcare topics from pharmaceutical happenings to patient safety. Read about some of our bloggers here.

Portions of this blog may also be found in the Inquirer's Sunday Health Section.

Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph. President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Daniel R. Hoffman, Ph.D. President, Pharmaceutical Business Research Associates
Hooman Noorchashm, M.D., Ph.D. Cardiothoracic surgeon in the Philadelphia area
Amy J. Reed, M.D., Ph.D. Anesthesiologist and Surgical Intensivist in the Philadelphia Area
Latest Health Videos
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter