Thursday, April 2, 2015

Stomach bypass surgery may cut sugar craving

In a type of gastric-bypass surgery called Roux-en-Y, the surgeon bypasses a large part of the stomach and replaces it with a small pouch.
Surprisingly, the procedure seems to do something to the patient's cravings for sweets, some have reported.

Stomach bypass surgery may cut sugar craving

Roux-en-Y stomach bypass
Roux-en-Y stomach bypass NIH

 

The Hershey people – the ones in the chocolate business, anyway -- may not like this one.

In a type of gastric-bypass surgery called Roux-en-Y, the surgeon bypasses a large part of the stomach and replaces it with a small pouch. In theory, the patient needs less food to feel “full,” enabling them to eat less and, as a result, lose weight.

But the procedure also seems to do something to the patient’s cravings for sweets, some have reported.

This was explored in greater depth in a study of rats, performed by the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.

After having the operation done, obese rats not only lost weight, but also showed a reduced preference for sugar water.

Some of the researchers were at Penn State’s Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

Doing their part to reduce candy consumption?

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About this blog

Check Up covers regional health news and a wide array of healthcare topics from pharmaceutical happenings to patient safety. Read about some of our bloggers here.

Portions of this blog may also be found in the Inquirer's Sunday Health Section.

Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph. President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Daniel R. Hoffman, Ph.D. President, Pharmaceutical Business Research Associates
Hooman Noorchashm, M.D., Ph.D. Cardiothoracic surgeon in the Philadelphia area
Amy J. Reed, M.D., Ph.D. Anesthesiologist and Surgical Intensivist in the Philadelphia Area
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