Wednesday, November 26, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Green tea doesn't cut breast cancer risk

Even if you glug a gallon of green tea daily, you won't cut your breast cancer risk, judging from a large Japanese study. Studies in lab dishes and animals have suggested that green tea may have a protective effect against breast cancer, but results from human studies have been inconclusive.

Green tea doesn't cut breast cancer risk

Even if you glug a gallon of green tea daily, you won’t cut your breast cancer risk, judging from a large Japanese study.

Studies in lab dishes and animals have suggested that green tea may have a protective effect against breast cancer, but results from human studies have been inconclusive.

The new study, led by researchers from Japan’s National Cancer Center, assessed the intake of two types of green tea by 54,000 women who completed a questionnaire at the beginning of the study and again five years later. Their consumption ranged from less than a cup per week to 10 cups or more per day.

Although 350 cases of breast cancer were diagnosed during 9.5 years of follow-up, there was no association between green tea drinking and the likelihood of cancer.

The study was published online last week in the journal Breast Cancer Research.
 

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Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph. President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Daniel R. Hoffman, Ph.D. President, Pharmaceutical Business Research Associates
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