Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Teething tablets contain deadly nightshade, FDA warns

If you use Hyland's Teething Tablets to try to ease your baby's misery, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration urges you to do this: Throw the stuff away and report any harmful symptoms. The melt-in-the-mouth tablets contain belladonna, also known as deadly nightshade, a plant with a long history of use as a medicine, cosmetic - and poison.

Teething tablets contain deadly nightshade, FDA warns

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By Inquirer Staff Writer Marie McCullough:

If you use Hyland's Teething Tablets to try to ease your baby’s misery, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration urges you to do this:

Throw the stuff away and report any harmful symptoms.

The melt-in-the-mouth tablets contain belladonna, also known as deadly nightshade, a plant with a long history of use as a medicine, cosmetic — and poison.

In a consumer alert issued Monday, the FDA said its lab analyses have found that Hyland’s Teething Tablets contain varying amounts of belladonna. FDA has also received reports of children suffering symptoms of belladonna toxicity, including seizures, difficulty breathing, lethargy, excessive sleepiness, muscle weakness, skin flushing, constipation, difficulty urinating, or agitation.

The manufacturer, Standard Homeopathic Company, agreed to “voluntarily” recall the product from the market after an FDA inspection found the firm’s manufacturing operation was “substandard,” the alert says.

The company advertises the tablets as making teething “easier for mother and baby for years.”

If the tablets have done quite the opposite for you and your baby, the FDA urges you to report side effects to the MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program: MedWatch or by calling (800) 332-1088.

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Check Up is a blog for savvy health consumers, covering the latest developments, discoveries, and debates from the Philadelphia area and beyond.

Portions of this blog may also be found in the Inquirer's Sunday Health Section.

Charlotte Sutton Health and Science Editor, Philadelphia Inquirer
Tom Avril Inquirer Staff Writer, heart health and general science
Stacey Burling Inquirer Staff Writer, neuroscience and aging
Marie McCullough Inquirer Staff Writer, cancer and women's health
Don Sapatkin Inquirer Staff Writer, public health
David Becker, M.D. Board certified cardiologist, Chestnut Hill Temple Cardiology
Michael R. Cohen, R.Ph. President, Institute for Safe Medication Practices
Daniel R. Hoffman, Ph.D. President, Pharmaceutical Business Research Associates
Hooman Noorchashm, M.D., Ph.D. Cardiothoracic surgeon in the Philadelphia area
Amy J. Reed, M.D., Ph.D. Anesthesiologist and Surgical Intensivist in the Philadelphia Area
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