Sunday, December 21, 2014

PA turns to social media to educate voters about new ID law

The Corbett administration wants you to "like" the state's new voter ID law.

PA turns to social media to educate voters about new ID law

The Corbett administration wants you to "like" the state's new voter ID law.

Well, ok, you don't have to "like" it or "friend" it, but at least click on it or follow it.

That's the message from the Department of State which has launched a new outreach effort using Facebook and Twitter to inform residents - particularly young people - about the new state voter ID law.

The new initiative comes as court watchers await a decision expected as early as today by Commonwealth Court Judge Robert Simpson on the fate of the voter ID law.

“We are using the VotesPA website and social media as tools to make Pennsylvania voters aware of the new voter ID law,” said Carol Aichele, secretary of the Commonwealth, whose department oversees elections. “We want to make sure voters understand what IDs are acceptable for voting, and help those who don’t have such IDs obtain the identification they need this fall."

The VotesPA website features a new layout that assists voters in finding information about which photo IDs are accepted at the polls, and how to obtain an acceptable ID. The website contains a “resource center” where voters can view frequently asked questions (FAQs). The information is available in English and Spanish.

The VotesPA website, initially created to help first-time voters, will continue to offer information on the voting process, including how to register, the locations of polling places, and important dates on the election schedule.

Information on the voter ID law is available at www.votesPA.com, pr by calling 1-877-VOTESPA (1-877-868-3772), on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/PADepartmentofState  or on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/VotesPA.

 

 

Click herefor Philly.com's politics page.

About this blog

Commonwealth Confidential gives you regularly updated coverage of the state legislature, the governor and the workings of the state bureaucracy. It is written by Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden in the Inquirer's Harrisburg bureau, based right in the statehouse, and by the newspaper's far-flung campaign reporters.



Commonwealth Confidential team
Also on Philly.com
Stay Connected