Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

PA makes TSA seized items available online

In the market for a Swiss Army knife? A pair of Oakley sunglasses or Gucci jewelry?

PA makes TSA seized items available online

In the market for a Swiss Army knife? A pair of Oakley sunglasses or Gucci belt? 

Ok, the stuff's used, but the items' owners didn't want to part with them.

You might get a good deal courtesy of the state of Pennsylvania as it launches an online auction of items seized by the Transportation Security Administration at mid-Atlantic airports.

“Online sales of TSA surplus property present a great opportunity for the public to get items they want for a good price, while generating revenue for Pennsylvania,” said Sheri Phillips, secretary of the Department of General Services. “We’re excited about getting this program started and being able to offer another service to the public.”

Anyone interested in bidding on items can visit www.govdeals.comand search listings by typiing "PA State Surplus" in the keyword search.

Right now deals are available on bulk lots: of pocket tools, assorted belts (men and ladies), letter openers and scissors.

Bid listings will be posted on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays as new property becomes available. Listings will feature various items such as knives, scissors, corkscrews, sunglasses, jewelry, belts and hand tools among other items. Brands include: Leatherman, Swiss Army, Gerber Multi-tools, Craftsman, Gucci, Prada and Oakley.

All revenue goes into the state's general fund.

Want to browse the goods in person? You can visit the state Surplis Distribution Center at 2221 Forster St., Harrisburg, which features a section of TSA surplus property for sale. The store operates Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.

Who knows you might even find that pen knife from your grandfather that TSA screeners snatched from you last year.

 

Click herefor Philly.com's politics page.

About this blog

Commonwealth Confidential gives you regularly updated coverage of the state legislature, the governor and the workings of the state bureaucracy. It is written by Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden in the Inquirer's Harrisburg bureau, based right in the statehouse, and by the newspaper's far-flung campaign reporters.



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