Friday, November 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Gov. Corbett: save money by spending money

The state wants to find ways to save money. The solution? Spend money to create a new office to find ways to save money.

Gov. Corbett: save money by spending money

 

The state wants to find ways to save money.

The solution? Spend money to create a new office to find ways to save money.

That is what Gov. Corbett is proposing to do, at least. The administration just announced it will be creating a new "Governor's Innovation Office," which will be charged with, well, finding ways ways to save money.

What the press release touting this new office doesn't say, however, is that it will require hiring a new director. Administration officials say this person will not be cabinet-level status, but he or she will be pretty high up there. The salary has not yet been determined, but could very well end up being in the six figures. Most cabinet-level folks, for instance, make in the $140,000 range.

Aside from a new director, there will be no new hires required, said Dan Egan, spokesman for the administration's Office of Administration, which will house the Innovation Office.

According to Egan, the Innovation Office will pore through the recommendations that are expected in May from Corbett's recently-assembled (and free) task force on privatizing state services. It will then decide which ones to implement, and in what order.

Beyond that, Innovation Office staffers will be responsible for reviewing cost-cutting proposals by state agencies, as well as suggestions submitted by the public through an online survey being conducted by the non-profit Team PA Foundation.

Is there an irony, though, to spending money and creating yet another layer of bureaucracy in order to cut spending and layers of bureaucracy?

Egan insists there isn't.

"We see a need for this going forward," he said.

Click here for Philly.com's politics page.

About this blog

Commonwealth Confidential gives you regularly updated coverage of the state legislature, the governor and the workings of the state bureaucracy. It is written by Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden in the Inquirer's Harrisburg bureau, based right in the statehouse, and by the newspaper's far-flung campaign reporters.



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