Thursday, August 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Gettysburg visitors center to remain open during federal shutdown

The federal government shut down has shuttered all 401 national parks across America, among them Gettysburg National Military Park.

Gettysburg visitors center to remain open during federal shutdown

The federal government shut down has shuttered all 401 national parks across America, among them Gettysburg National Military Park.

Filmmaker Ken Burns, who wrote and directed the landmark Civil War series on PBS,  in a Tweet earlier today wondered what President Lincoln would say about the battlefield being closed in its 150th anniversary year.

But tourists and Civil War fans take heart, the visitors center and museum are still open.

Since its opening in 2008, the visitors center and museum at Gettysburg has been owned and operated by the private Gettysburg Foundation.

As a result of the unique partnership it is unaffected by the shutdown - the only national park visitors center in the nation open today.

"We get no federal money so its not subject to the same regulations," said foundation president Joanne Hanley, who added that programs and even some tours are still scheduled.

The visitors center features an array of exhibits depicting various elements of the three-day battle, a movie "A New Birth of Freedom," narrated by Morgan Freeman, and the famed Cyclorama painting depicting Pickett's Charge. There is an admission fee. Check the website for details.

The park. however, is closed so visitors will not be allowed to drive or walk on the battlefield. There are places along the state roads that run through the park where you can view the battlefield. For more on the specifics of road openings and closures see an overview in The Evening Sun here.

 

 

 

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About this blog

Commonwealth Confidential gives you regularly updated coverage of the state legislature, the governor and the workings of the state bureaucracy. It is written by Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden in the Inquirer's Harrisburg bureau, based right in the statehouse, and by the newspaper's far-flung campaign reporters.



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