Friday, September 19, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Corbett: Not so fast, Congresswoman...

Corbett: Not so fast, Congresswoman...

 

Democratic U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz may not have yet made up her mind about whether she will challenge Gov. Corbett in 2014, but that hasn't stopped folks from talking about how she could be Pennsylvania's first female governor.

Not if Corbett has any say.

Earlier this week found the governor at the State Museum in Harrisburg to celebrate what he was now decreeing as "Hannah Callowhill Penn Day."

That would be William Penn's second wife, the woman historians say ruled the colony of Pennsylvania for six years after her husband was incapacitated by a stroke in 1712. And after William Penn's death, she ruled for another eight years.

The way Corbett sees it, she really was the first female governor of Pennsylvania. Her title may have technically been "proprietess"  --  there was no title back then of "governor," at least not in Pennsylvania -- but she ran the state.

"Technically, as the proprietess, she was the governor," Corbett said at the State Museum event to honor Hannah Penn's legacy, during which he also announced that she will be posthumously given an award recognizing women whose professional accomplishments have "reflected honor" on their communities, the state and the country.

Corbett said that along the ceiling in his Capitol office are portraits of all Pennsylvania governors past - all men -- and that there is now a portrait being commissioned of Hannah Penn so she can be added to her rightful place among them..

Asked whether this effort had anything to do with knocking some wind out of Schwartz's political sails, should she decide to run against him, Corbett's response: "This has nothing to do with that. This is about Hannah Penn."

 

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About this blog

Commonwealth Confidential gives you regularly updated coverage of the state legislature, the governor and the workings of the state bureaucracy. It is written by Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden in the Inquirer's Harrisburg bureau, based right in the statehouse, and by the newspaper's far-flung campaign reporters.



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