Thursday, July 10, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Massachusetts rates teachers based on test scores

Massachusetts' education commissioner proposed a set of regulations that would radically overhaul the way teachers and administrators are evaluated, making student MCAS results central to judging their performance, according to a Boston Globe article.

Massachusetts rates teachers based on test scores

Massachusetts' education commissioner proposed a set of regulations that would radically overhaul the way teachers and administrators are evaluated, making student MCAS results central to judging their performance, according to a Boston Globe article.

The proposed regulations would reward teachers and administrators whose students show more than a year’s worth of growth in proficiency under the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System and on other exams, while educators whose students underperform would be placed on one-year “improvement plans.’’ Under the proposal, teachers could face termination if they do not demonstrate progress.

The goal is to fix a long-broken evaluation system that too often fails to provide constructive feedback to educators on how they need to improve and on what they are doing right, Mitchell Chester, the state’s commissioner of elementary and secondary education, said in an interview.

Should Pennsylvania consider adopting a similar method to evaluate its teachers?

 

 

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