Saturday, August 23, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Archive: March, 2012

POSTED: Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 12:44 PM

I don't want to say that things sometimes get a little weird in the world of accused felon state Sen. Jane Orie...no, wait, that's exactly what I want to say.

Two trials under way, one in Pittsburgh, one in Harrisburg, suggest that things inside that world aren't always what they seem.

To refresh your memory, Orie is on trial for a second time in Pittsburgh on charges she used her Senate office for campaign work, including helping her sister, state Supreme Court Justice Joan Orie Melvin, win a seat on the high court. Another sister, Janine Orie, is also charged and faces trial at a later date. Their first trial ended in a mistrial amid charges of evidence tampering. And sister Joan is reportedly the target of an ongoing investigation.

POSTED: Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 10:26 AM

For all of you keeping score at home, the state Legislature's various scams, scandals and corruption schemes now tally 22 convictions or guilty pleas.

Gotta make ya Pennsylvania Proud.

Plus, we're not yet done counting, or wondering why there aren't even more.

POSTED: Monday, March 5, 2012, 8:54 AM

(A brief discussion twixt Baer & Baer's editor, a.k.a. BE)

JB: Yo, boss, looks like your boy Rick is slipping on the slope to Super Tuesday.

BE: Whaddya mean? Even YOU suggest in today's column that Santorum could be a spoiler who throws the GOP convention open in August.

POSTED: Friday, March 2, 2012, 10:43 AM

And now, in the category of "oh, what do the people who actually pay taxes to support our elected officials know?" comes some insight into how PA voters would balance the state budget.

This is from data deep inside last week's Franklin & Marshall College Poll that mainly focused on Santorum, Romney and Obama.

What this other data shows is statewide voters' views on key issues, and a slight shift in some of those views compared to a year ago.

POSTED: Thursday, March 1, 2012, 10:52 AM

A new "policy" announced yesterday restricting protesters' access to areas near the governor's office does the Corbett administration little good and underscores an uncaring stereotype for Republicans and Gov. Corbett.

Also, it openly invites further demonstrations attempting to violate the policy, which could result in unnecessary confrontation and possible arrests, highlighting the very issues the administration prefers to downplay.

Here's what happened. A large group of disabled people, many in wheelchairs, rallied at the Capitol to protest budget cuts to in-home and community services impacting their lives.

About this blog
John Baer has been covering politics and government for the Daily News since 1987. The National Journal in 2002 called Baer one of the country's top 10 political journalists outside Washington, saying Baer has, "the ability to take the skin off a politician without making it hurt too much." E-mail John at baerj@phillynews.com.

John is the author of the book "On The Front Lines of Pennsylvania Politics: Twenty-Five Years of Keystone Reporting" (The History Press, 2012). Reach John at baerj@phillynews.com.

John Baer Daily News Political Columnist
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