Saturday, October 25, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Best Campaign Bloopers

One way to ease the tension of a close election is to look back at the best campaign bloopers.

Best Campaign Bloopers

For those who might be experiencing a little nail-biting tension over Tuesday's presidential election, here's a short break from the serious business of electing a president.

Sunday's Washington Post included a list of best-worst stuff from the 2012 campaign, and the list includes an example of the "silliest" bloopers from each side.

The "silliest" Republican version is tied to that famous photo of Barack Obama in Iowa during the `08 campaign standing on a stage during what was claimed to be the Pledge of Allegiance without holding his hand over his heart.

But Pulitzer Prize-winning PolitiFact.com notes that the photo really was shot during the national anthem and while some disagree, others, including Obama, contend you sing during the anthem and place your hand over your heart during the pledge.

Also, the Post notes that until he was called on it, Mitt Romney would include a line in his stump speeches this year:"We are on the only people on the Earth that put our hand over our heart during the playing of the national anthem."

But Post fact-checkers say a simple survey of YouTube found samples of sports figures and school children from all over the world placing their hands over their hearts during their nations' anthems.

The "silliest" Democratic blooper, according to the Post, was Obama's claim that Republican President Rutherford B. Hayes, who served in the White House from 1877 to 1881, was so opposed to new ideas that when the telephone was introduced he asked, "Who would ever use one?"

Turns out the 19th president actually had the first phone in Washington, in the White House, and his telephone number (I love this) was "1."

So, take voting seriously...but not all the stuff you might hear or see connected to campaigns.

 

John Baer Daily News Political Columnist
About this blog
John Baer has been covering politics and government for the Daily News since 1987. The National Journal in 2002 called Baer one of the country's top 10 political journalists outside Washington, saying Baer has, "the ability to take the skin off a politician without making it hurt too much." E-mail John at baerj@phillynews.com.

John is the author of the book "On The Front Lines of Pennsylvania Politics: Twenty-Five Years of Keystone Reporting" (The History Press, 2012). Reach John at baerj@phillynews.com.

John Baer Daily News Political Columnist
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