Friday, November 28, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

$58,000 to stem the flow in NE Philly

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $58,000 in grants from its urban waters program to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society for 10 "green infrastructure" projects.

$58,000 to stem the flow in NE Philly

At a presentation are (from left) Drew Becher, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society; Julie Slavet, Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership; Barbara McCabe, Philadelphia Parks & Recreation; William C. Early, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (EPA photo)  <br />
At a presentation are (from left) Drew Becher, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society; Julie Slavet, Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership; Barbara McCabe, Philadelphia Parks & Recreation; William C. Early, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (EPA photo)

I can't think of an urban stream that doesn't have flooding problems.

Earlier this week, the situation got a little sunnier for the Tookany/Tacony-Frankford watershed in Northeast Philadelphia.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $58,000 in grants from its urban waters program to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society for 10 "green infrastructure" projects -- such as rain gardens and other projects to hold back the gush of stormwater and keep it from flooding streams.

Officials are short on details, except that one will help prevent flooding and restore the section of the Tacony Creek behind Friends Hospital on Roosevelt Boulevard.

Other tactics to be funded by the money include training, outreach and education, group presentations and the development of on-line resources.

The idea is to link community priorities -- neighborhood beautification, improved recreational amenities, crime reduction, employment and the like -- with environmental improvements. The Tookany/Tacony-Frankford watershed includes neighborhoods in North, Northeast and Northwest Philadelphia, and parts of Montgomery County.

Sandy Bauers Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
About this blog

GreenSpace is about environmental issues and green living. Bauers also writes a biweekly GreenSpace column about environmental health issues for the Inquirer’s Sunday “Health” section.

Sandy Bauers is the environment reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer, where she has worked for more than 20 years as a reporter and editor. She lives in northern Chester County with her husband, two cats, a large vegetable garden and a flock of pet chickens.

Reach Sandy at sbauers@phillynews.com.

Sandy Bauers Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
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