Friday, August 28, 2015

Witch hazel: Good for whatever ails ya

This bucolic scene interrupted a very gray landscape this morning on my walk to the train station. It was chilly, lightly snowing, very hilly and not much fun if you'd rather be sleeping past 6:30 a.m. Note the chic "distressed" look of the fence. Nice touch, don't you think?

Witch hazel: Good for whatever ails ya

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Witch hazel is billed as a help for everything from acne to swelling and "wounds" from childbirth.
Witch hazel is billed as a help for everything from acne to swelling and "wounds" from childbirth.

This bucolic scene interrupted a very gray landscape this morning on my walk to the train station. It was chilly, lightly snowing, very hilly and not much fun if you'd rather be sleeping past 6:30 a.m. Note the chic "distressed" look of the fence. Nice touch, don't you think?

But it was the fuzzy yellow flowers that have caught my eye all week on this dreary journey down the hill in the morning and back up in the evening. Before early light or just as darkness falls, there's literally not much that beats witch hazel in March. There are lots of beautiful ones at Chanticleer, but there is much else that's beautiful at Chanticleer in March, too. In the city? In a concrete neighborhood partial to English ivy in the "front yards" of its row houses? It's quite unusual to see this kind of thing.

And did you know we have Peter Collinson, John Bartram's plant-crazy pen pal in England, to thank for the introduction of witch hazel to the U.S.? That man is everywhere.

The medicinal witch hazel is something I've never tried; it was much more common in our parents' and grandparents' generations, but it's around. (Even Burt's Bees, which is a little like Peter Collinson in its ubiquity, has a product.) Good grief, it's billed as a help for everything from acne to swelling and "wounds" from childbirth. I better get some of this stuff ASAP.

Meanwhile, just the sight of the mother plant, to continue with the childbirth theme, is a tonic in its own right.

Inquirer Staff Writer
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About this blog
Ginny Smith, a Philadelphia native, joined the Inquirer at 1985. After stints as both reporter and editor in the city and suburbs, she’s been happily writing – and learning - about gardening full time since 2006. She’s won two silver medals of achievement from the national Garden Writers Association and in 2011, Bartram’s Garden honored her with its Green Exemplar award for her stories about “the region’s deeply rooted horticultural history, cultural attractions and bountiful gardens.” She plays in her own – mostly - bountiful garden in East Falls. Reach Virginia A. at vsmith@phillynews.com .

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
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