Saturday, February 28, 2015

An invite: 'The snowdrops first upon the scene ...'

Wanted to share this delightful invitation to a snowdrop fest! or "Galanthus gala," as the host is calling it. It's snowdrop season, at long last. This cheery harbinger of spring never fails to please. But there's something else out there, too - hellebores.

An invite: 'The snowdrops first upon the scene ...'

Wanted to share this delightful invitation to a snowdrop fest! or "Galanthus gala," as the host is calling it. It´s snowdrop season, at long last. This cheery harbinger of spring never fails to please.
Wanted to share this delightful invitation to a snowdrop fest! or "Galanthus gala," as the host is calling it. It's snowdrop season, at long last. This cheery harbinger of spring never fails to please.

Wanted to share this delightful invitation to a snowdrop fest! or "Galanthus gala," as the host is calling it. It's snowdrop season, at long last. This cheery harbinger of spring never fails to please. But there's something else out there, too - hellebores.

Angela Treadwell-Palmer, co-cofounder of Plants Nouveau, a company that markets new plants, is a huge fan of hellebores, which are big in the hort world but not so much on the radar of ordinary gardeners. Which is a shame.

Angela, whom I interviewed at length this week for a story about new plants, thinks hellebores should be way more popular than they are. "If we could get people to buy hellebores from Thanksgiving to Valentine's Day...(as gifts)...

"They're so tough. After the holidays, you can plant them outside and have great success," she says. And - here's a bonus - they take dry shade and deer don't eat them. "What more could you ask?" says Angela.

With all due respect to snowdrops - which I like just as well, though they don't last nearly as long as hellebores.

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
About this blog
Ginny Smith, a Philadelphia native, joined the Inquirer at 1985. After stints as both reporter and editor in the city and suburbs, she’s been happily writing – and learning - about gardening full time since 2006. She’s won two silver medals of achievement from the national Garden Writers Association and in 2011, Bartram’s Garden honored her with its Green Exemplar award for her stories about “the region’s deeply rooted horticultural history, cultural attractions and bountiful gardens.” She plays in her own – mostly - bountiful garden in East Falls. Reach Virginia A. at vsmith@phillynews.com .

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
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