Sunday, September 21, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

"The Juno of our groves"

That's how Thomas Jefferson described the tulip poplar tree whose seeds he sent to a friend in Paris in 1805, according to the Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia. It's a tree worth admiring today, as well. This was one of many encountered on a hike through the Schuylkill Center over the weekend.

"The Juno of our groves"

That's how Thomas Jefferson described the tulip poplar tree whose seeds he sent to a friend in Paris in 1805, according to the Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia. It's a tree worth admiring today, as well. This was one of many encountered on a hike through the Schuylkill Center over the weekend.

These days I'm channeling our second president, having just bought A Rich Spot of Earth, the newest book by Peter Hatch,  director of the gardens and grounds of Monticello since 1977. I spoke to Peter a few years ago for a story about olive trees, I think, and he was full of marvelous tales about Jefferson's fascination with them. And all else, which is why Monticello is on my list of "must visit" places! 

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
About this blog
Ginny Smith, a Philadelphia native, joined the Inquirer at 1985. After stints as both reporter and editor in the city and suburbs, she’s been happily writing – and learning - about gardening full time since 2006. She’s won two silver medals of achievement from the national Garden Writers Association and in 2011, Bartram’s Garden honored her with its Green Exemplar award for her stories about “the region’s deeply rooted horticultural history, cultural attractions and bountiful gardens.” She plays in her own – mostly - bountiful garden in East Falls. Reach Virginia A. at vsmith@phillynews.com .

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
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