Thursday, July 2, 2015

Reconsidering a weirdly named plant

I used to dismiss fothergilla. Though intrigued by the name, I thought its flowers were boring. Then I met Steve Wright, curator of plant collections at Jenkins. He's the first to hold the job since Jenkins was designated a national collection of azaleas, rhodies and mountain laurels by the American Public Gardens Association, which means the collection is open to botanical institutions that might want to take cuttings and germ plasma. Steve is a native plant enthusiast, to say the least.

Reconsidering a weirdly named plant

0 comments

I used to dismiss fothergilla. Though intrigued by the name, I thought its flowers were boring. Then I met Steve Wright, curator of plant collections at Jenkins. He's the first to hold the job since Jenkins was designated a national collection of azaleas, rhodies and mountain laurels by the American Public Gardens Association, which means the collection is open to botanical institutions that might want to take cuttings and germ plasma. Steve is a native plant enthusiast, to say the least.

Which, during a lengthy chat last week, led us to the subject of dwarf fothergilla (Fothergilla gardenii), pictured here in full spring bloom - and then to the plant itself, which is growing happily in Jenkins' Green Ribbon Native Plant garden. Fothergilla is in the witch hazel family, which is obvious from the blooms. They also have a faint honey scent. Very nice. Steve loves this plant in no small measure because of its fall color; the blue-green leaves turn red, yellow, purple, all at once. "All in all, a great plant for the home garden," he says.

And talk about versatile. It grows about 3 feet by 3 feet in anything from full sun to full shade. Looks especially cool in masses. And, hard to believe, fothergilla is not especially prone to disease or insect pests. Sounds too good to be true.

Now about the name ... Fothergilla was named for John Fothergill, an English physician with a side interest in botany and natural history who corresponded with John Bartram for more than two decades. Gardenii comes from Alexander Garden (true story), who first collected the plant and is better known for being the namesake of the gardenia.

Now that I know the origin of the name(s),  Fothergilla gardenii is sounding better and better.

Inquirer Staff Writer
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog
Ginny Smith, a Philadelphia native, joined the Inquirer at 1985. After stints as both reporter and editor in the city and suburbs, she’s been happily writing – and learning - about gardening full time since 2006. She’s won two silver medals of achievement from the national Garden Writers Association and in 2011, Bartram’s Garden honored her with its Green Exemplar award for her stories about “the region’s deeply rooted horticultural history, cultural attractions and bountiful gardens.” She plays in her own – mostly - bountiful garden in East Falls. Reach Virginia A. at vsmith@phillynews.com .

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com
letter icon Newsletter