Saturday, August 30, 2014
Inquirer Daily News

Eiffel Tower

This week construction began on the Eiffel Tower, part of the central feature at this year's flower show. Here you see welder Richard Cousins working away at Scenery First, which has had a major role in building features and sets at the show for more than a decade. I visited co-owners Jack Doyle and Michael Barone this morning at their shop in Sharon Hill. They bid for the flower show job every August, and said this year, because of the economy, a lot of the competition fell away, which means better odds of getting the job and also ... a busier time all around for their ompany. Ninety percent of their business is building sets for revues and shows on cruise lines - yes, the cruise business is booming - but they also do work for the Wilma, Philadelphia Theater Co. and others. "This past fall was crazy," Jack says. Workers just started putting together the pre-fab pieces of the tower, which has to be finished a full week before the flower show opens. And, Jack says, the biggest challenge is getting the giant sections into the tractor trailer for transport to the Convention Center. Once assembled, the tower will be 33 feet tall and 75 wide, visible from anywhere on the show floor. It's the tallest structure ever for the show, which runs from March 6-13.

Eiffel Tower

This week construction began on the Eiffel Tower, part of the central feature at this year's flower show. Here you see welder Richard Cousins working away at Scenery First, which has had a major role in building features and sets at the show for more than a decade. I visited co-owners Jack Doyle and Michael Barone this morning at their shop in Sharon Hill. They bid for the flower show job every August, and said this year, because of the economy, a lot of the competition fell away, which means better odds of getting the job and also ... a busier time all around for their ompany. Ninety percent of their business is building sets for revues and shows on cruise lines - yes, the cruise business is booming - but they also do work for the Wilma, Philadelphia Theater Co. and others. "This past fall was crazy," Jack says. Workers just started putting together the pre-fab pieces of the tower, which has to be finished a full week before the flower show opens. And, Jack says, the biggest challenge is getting the giant sections into the tractor trailer for transport to the Convention Center. Once assembled, the tower will be 33 feet tall and 75 wide, visible from anywhere on the show floor. It's the tallest structure ever for the show, which runs from March 6-13.  

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
About this blog
Ginny Smith, a Philadelphia native, joined the Inquirer at 1985. After stints as both reporter and editor in the city and suburbs, she’s been happily writing – and learning - about gardening full time since 2006. She’s won two silver medals of achievement from the national Garden Writers Association and in 2011, Bartram’s Garden honored her with its Green Exemplar award for her stories about “the region’s deeply rooted horticultural history, cultural attractions and bountiful gardens.” She plays in her own – mostly - bountiful garden in East Falls. Reach Virginia A. at vsmith@phillynews.com .

Virginia A. Smith Inquirer Staff Writer
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