Sunday, August 2, 2015

Playing the Race Card? Ludacris!

It kills me when African Americans get accused of playing the "race card." As if pointing out past and present injustices is wrong, weak-minded and smacks of victimization. Heck, if anything, challenging your country to do the right thing is not playing the race card. It's what concerned Americans do.

Playing the Race Card? Ludacris!

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 In this Nov. 29, 2006 file photo, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., and rapper Ludacris leave the senator´s Chicago offices after a meeting. Maybe Luda is suggesting another song for Obama´s i-Pod.
In this Nov. 29, 2006 file photo, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., and rapper Ludacris leave the senator's Chicago offices after a meeting. Maybe Luda is suggesting another song for Obama's i-Pod.

It kills me when African Americans get accused of playing the "race card." As if pointing out past and present  injustices is wrong, weak-minded and smacks of victimization. Heck, if anything, challenging your country to do the right  thing is not playing the race card. It's what concerned Americans do.

Not only that, blacks generally can't play the race card because they're seldom in the game. It's a game of power that only the people in those positions can play, and it's usually white men who get hands worth playing.

So yeah, I'm calling John McCain's bluff  over his claim that Barack Obama played the race card by describing himself as the guy with the funny name who "doesn't look like all those other presidents on the dollar bills." I mean, you don't have to take an inventory of your dwindling cash to make that argument.

  If you want want to talk real race card, let's talk about McCain's constantly refusing to  vote for a Martin Luther King holiday in his home state of Arizona until the NFL threatened to boycott.

Oh, and let's talk about McCain, in his desperation,  likening Obama to Britney Spears and Paris Hilton, an image infused with racial overtones. It's unfair that Obama has to answer to almost everybody and everything that has nothing  to do with the serious issues that plague America. Silly and ridiculous. Not to mention Ludacris.

Inquirer Columnist
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About this blog
Annette John-Hall is a metro columnist for The Inquirer. She was previously a features reporter and columnist focusing on music, film television and pop culture. A native of Berkeley, Calif., she covered professional, college and high school sports at the San Jose Mercury News, the Rocky Mountain News in Denver and the Oakland Tribune. Reach Annette at johnhaa@phillynews.com.

Annette John-Hall
Annette John-Hall Inquirer Columnist
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