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Inquirer Daily News

Archive: March, 2012

POSTED: Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 10:09 AM
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The only court he's aiming at is the court of public opinion

Patrick Murphy is confused.  He started out running for Attorney General of Pennsylvania.  But somewhere along the line, he became convinced that he was running for the state Supreme Court.  That’s because he’s apparently decided that he should be in a position to determine the constitutionality of laws.  Which, as anyone who’s ever heard the words “Marbury” and “Madison” knows, is the sole province of the courts.

In an article discussing protests against the bill which would require women to undergo ultrasounds prior to obtaining an abortion, the former Congressman and army veteran is quoted as having said he wouldn’t enforce such a law because he doesn’t think it would be constitutional.

The problem is, that wouldn’t be Attorney General Murphy’s call.  That might be Justice Murphy’s call, but as far as I know, he hasn’t decided to throw his hat in the ring and seek a spot on the high court (one that might possibly be vacated by one of the Orie Sisters…which, parenthetically,  sounds like an act on the Lawrence Welk show.)

Christine Flowers @ 10:09 AM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, March 26, 2012, 4:48 PM

There is a certain irony evident in those who self-identify as progressives and actively support the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

It is an undeniable fact that those who stand for individual rights and autonomy in the most intimate spheres of daily life have no problem with a statutory monolith that will give Uncle Sam a giant peephole into every corner of it (and not just the sacred, private bedroom.)

It's not merely the legally vulnerable "individual mandate" which has a good chance of succumbing to a constitutional challenge on commerce clause grounds (if, that is, the justices are wise enough to understand that 'non-activity' cannot be regulated even by those fanciful New Deal standards championed by FDR.)

Christine Flowers @ 4:48 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Saturday, March 24, 2012, 4:03 PM
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I believe a person has a right to defend himself against an imminent threat to his  safety.

I believe a person needs to feel safe in their home (which should actually be a 'home' and not an undefined area beyond the front door)

I believe that anyone who shoots in self-defense needs to prove that there was a real, and not simply a subjective, "I really felt like I was in danger" sense that their bodily integrity was threatened.

Christine Flowers @ 4:03 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 12:00 PM
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Trayvon Martin’s smile is haunting me.  I see it in the photos broadcast on the nightly news programs, in the newspaper, and when I close my eyes.  It’s a wide, shy slice of youth and happiness.  And now, it’s permanently erased.

The person who guaranteed that the smile would be frozen in photos  is a self-styled town-watch volunteer, which in Florida seems to be spelled V-I-G-I-L-A-N-T-E.  The laws in that state, like the laws in many others, make it okay to “stand your ground” in self-defense, and a shooter under those circumstances is almost guaranteed a “don’t even get into jail” card.  But George Zimmerman, the man who erased Trayvon Martin’s smile, might not be able to cower behind that questionable law, because by his own admission on a 911 tape, he was actively following the victim.

In that strange Floridian lexicon, that seems to be spelled “S-T-A-L-K-I-N-G.”

Christine Flowers @ 12:00 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 12:00 PM
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Trayvon Martin’s smile is haunting me.  I see it in the photos broadcast on the nightly news programs, in the newspaper, and when I close my eyes.  It’s a wide, shy slice of youth and happiness.  And now, it’s permanently erased.

The person who guaranteed that the smile would be frozen in photos  is a self-styled town-watch volunteer, which in Florida seems to be spelled V-I-G-I-L-A-N-T-E.  The laws in that state, like the laws in many others, make it okay to “stand your ground” in self-defense, and a shooter under those circumstances is almost guaranteed a “don’t even get into jail” card.  But George Zimmerman, the man who erased Trayvon Martin’s smile, might not be able to cower behind that questionable law, because by his own admission on a 911 tape, he was actively following the victim.

In that strange Floridian lexicon, that seems to be spelled “S-T-A-L-K-I-N-G.”

Christine Flowers @ 12:00 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Tuesday, March 20, 2012, 1:27 PM

Next week, the Supreme Court gets a whack at the health care bill.  And something tells me that President Obama is biting his nails just now.

That’s because despite all of the optimistic comments from his friends and supporters in the legal community, there’s a very strong chance that Obamacare will be invalidated in at least one very important aspect: the individual mandate.  And that mandate is like the Alamo; if it falls, so does Texas a/k/a the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Some legal eagles would have you believe that there’s nothing wrong with forcing people to buy a product they might otherwise not want to purchase.  They compare it to the taxing authority of the United States.  In other words, they say, if you can tax someone and then use that money to provide for the “general welfare” (e.g. universal health insurance,) you should also be able to just cut out the middle man (Uncle Sam) and force we the bleating citizen sheep to buy our own insurance.

Christine Flowers @ 1:27 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
POSTED: Monday, March 19, 2012, 2:41 PM

My brother committed suicide. I miss him terribly, and think of him often, particularly when I see a martial arts film (he was a Black Belt,) walk down South Street (one of his favorite haunts) or read about St. Joe’s Prep (his alma mater.)  He was an amazing person, unique and precious, and his loss is immeasurable.

I’m sure the family of Tyler Clementi feels the same way about their beloved son.  And yet, Tyler’s suicide became a cause célèbre because some people think making political points is more important than doing justice.  And that makes me very, very angry.

Suicide is not a political act. It is an act of desperation, of impulsivity, of short sightedness and, sometimes, of selfishness.  But no one forces you to take your life. Whatever demons haunt us, they are our own and no one else bears the blame for our decision to leave this world deliberately, and prematurely.

Christine Flowers @ 2:41 PM  Permalink | 0 comments
About this blog
See Christine Flowers on Channel 6's "Inside Story" Sunday at 11:30 a.m.

Email Christine M. at cflowers1961@yahoo.com Reach Christine M. at cflowers1961@yahoo.com.

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