Friday, February 12, 2016

Oscars: May the Best Woman Win

To the extent that the Oscars are symbolic of professional acceptance of women outside the acting ranks, today's announcement of Academy Award nominations are gratifying on several fronts.

Oscars: May the Best Woman Win

0 comments
Kissing Adversaries: Meryl Streep and Sandra Bullock suck face at an awards show.
Kissing Adversaries: Meryl Streep and Sandra Bullock suck face at an awards show.

To the extent that the Oscars are symbolic of professional acceptance of women outside the acting ranks, today's announcement of Academy Award nominations are gratifying on several fronts.

Kathryn Bigelow became the fourth woman to get a best director nod. Here's what I said today about what her win might represent.

Two of the 10 best picture nominees, Bigelow's The Hurt Locker and Lone Scherfig's An Education, are directed by female helmers.

The indefatigable Meryl Streep and Helen Mirren were nominated for the umpteenth times for Julie & Julia and The Last Station, joined by first-time nominees Sandra Bullock (The Blind Side), Carey Mulligan (An Education) and Gabourey Sidibe (Precious).

Female art directors were involved in four of the five nominated films; female designers were nominated four four of the five best costume bids; for of the documentary nominees were directed or co-directed by women.

The music and technical nominations were dominated by men, although Sally Menke (Inglourious Basterds) got a nomination for editing and Gwendolyn Whittle is part of the nominated sound editing duo for Avatar.

In the screenwriting categories, usually areas where there are multiple nominees, only Terri Tatchell, who co-wrote District 9, scored a nomination. Nora Ephron's witty Julie & Julia was undeservedly shut out.

Besides the "battle of the exes" race between Bigelow (nine nominations for Hurt Locker) and her former spouse James Cameron (nine for Avatar), the most interesting races are in the acting categories. Will beloved Hollywood veteran Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart) edge out beloved Hollywood glamorpuss George Clooney (Up in the Air)? Can first-time nominee Sandra Bullock beat 16-time nominee Meryl Streep, who hasn't won an Oscar in 25 years? I like all four performances. At Oscar time, though, seriousness (Bridges, Bullock) usually trumps lightness (Clooney, Streep).

Your thoughts?

Film Critic
0 comments
We encourage respectful comments but reserve the right to delete anything that doesn't contribute to an engaging dialogue.
Help us moderate this thread by flagging comments that violate our guidelines.

Comment policy:

Philly.com comments are intended to be civil, friendly conversations. Please treat other participants with respect and in a way that you would want to be treated. You are responsible for what you say. And please, stay on topic. If you see an objectionable post, please report it to us using the "Report Abuse" option.

Please note that comments are monitored by Philly.com staff. We reserve the right at all times to remove any information or materials that are unlawful, threatening, abusive, libelous, defamatory, obscene, vulgar, pornographic, profane, indecent or otherwise objectionable. Personal attacks, especially on other participants, are not permitted. We reserve the right to permanently block any user who violates these terms and conditions.

Additionally comments that are long, have multiple paragraph breaks, include code, or include hyperlinks may not be posted.

Read 0 comments
 
comments powered by Disqus
About this blog

Carrie Rickey Film Critic
Latest Videos:
Also on Philly.com:
letter icon Newsletter