WATCH: Main Line's Neal Brennan to premiere ‘3 Mics’ comedy special on Netflix this month

Main Line native Neal Brennan will premiere a new comedy special on Netflix this month, but with three total microphones, this one has a bit of a twist.

Brennan, 43, of Villanova, will drop 3 Mics, his newest standup special, on Netflix on Tuesday, Jan. 17. Described in a release as “a break from classic standup comedy,” the special will feature Brennan transition between three microphones, with each being designated for a certain style of comedy.

One mic will be for traditional stand-up, a second for one-liners, and a third for short monologues dealing with topics like depression and family relationships. The show initially ran in Los Angeles in 2015 before Brennan brought it to New York City for an off-Broadway run in 2016.

The special will serve as Brennan’s first full-length stand-up special since 2014’s Neal Brennan: Women and Black Dudes, which aired on Comedy Central.

Best known for his work co-creating, co-writing, and co-executive producing Chappelle’s Show with Dave Chappelle, Brennan as been active in entertainment since 1995, when he broke into the business writing for the MTV dating show Singled Out. In addition to his work on Chappelle’s Show, Brennan has also written for shows including Kenan & Kel and All That, and directed episodes of Inside Amy Schumer, The New Girl, and The Mindy Project. He has also contributed writing to films including Half Baked and Totally Awesome.

Brennan is a regular standup performer, and has appeared on shows including Conan, Last Call with Carson Daly, and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. Brennan even famously recommended The Roots to Fallon as as the house band for Late Night, a move the host carried on when he took over The Tonight Show.

Brennan and his 10 person family moved from the Villanave to Wayne, and then to Chicago and back to Wayne, according to a 2014 Inquirer article. It was during Brennan’s time at Radnor’s Archbishop Carroll High School that he was introduced to the New York comedy scene, which ultimately led to his career.

“It was transformative,” he said of the experience in 2014. It was really helpful to spend time with a young Dave Attell and a young Ray Romano. The scary part was taking SEPTA to Jersey Transit. That was straight-up Third World.”